Tag Archives: Sterling Medical Advice

Straight, No Chaser: The Emotional Signs of Child Abuse

child-abuse report

In a previous Straight, No Chaser, we provided a pictorial demonstration of the physical signs of child abuse. Unfortunately for many, the emotional signs are even more dangerous. It’s important for you to be able to recognize the subtle emotional cues that could represent a high-risk situation for a child. Too often people take a laissez-faire approach to “abnormally acting” children. Your raising and reporting concerns could save lives.

One very important consideration is that reporting abnormal situations isn’t the same as making accusations. It’s better to think of it as establishing a path for whatever type of help is needed. To that end, today’s post will share information provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help you recognize when a child may be in danger. Pay attention because it could be your child that is affected, and it’s not always true that what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger.

child abuse emotional

The Child

• Shows sudden changes in behavior or school performance

• Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention

• Has learning problems (or difficulty concentrating) that cannot be attributed to specific physical or psychological causes

• Is always watchful, as though preparing for something bad to happen

• Lacks adult supervision

• Is overly compliant, passive, or withdrawn

• Comes to school or other activities early, stays late and does not want to go home

• Is reluctant to be around a particular person

• Discloses maltreatment

child abuse emotional no excuse

The Parent

• Denies the existence of—or blames the child for—the child’s problems in school or at home

• Asks teachers or other caregivers to use harsh physical discipline if the child misbehaves

• Sees the child as entirely bad, worthless or burdensome

• Demands a level of physical or academic performance the child cannot achieve

• Looks primarily to the child for care, attention, and satisfaction of the parent’s emotional needs

• Shows little concern for the child

child abuse emotional tears

The Parent and Child

• Rarely touch or look at each other

• Consider their relationship entirely negative

• State that they do not like each other

The above list may not be all the signs of abuse or neglect. It is important to pay attention to other behaviors that may seem unusual or concerning. In addition to these signs and symptoms, Child Welfare Information Gateway provides information on the risk factors and perpetrators of child abuse and neglect fatalities:  https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/can/

child_abuse_poster_by_darkblade221-d6e0std

Signs of Physical Abuse

Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the child …

• Has unexplained burns, bites, bruises, broken bones or black eyes

• Has fading bruises or other marks noticeable after an absence from school

• Seems frightened of the parents and protests or cries when it is time to go home

• Shrinks at the approach of adults

• Reports injury by a parent or another adult caregiver

• Abuses animals or pets

Emotional-Child-Abuse

Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the parent or other adult caregiver …

• Offers conflicting, unconvincing or no explanation for the child’s injury, or provides an explanation that is not consistent with the injury

• Describes the child as “evil” or in some other very negative way

• Uses harsh physical discipline with the child

• Has a history of abuse as a child

• Has a history of abusing animals or pets

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under General Health and Wellness, Mental Health, Pediatrics/Kids Health, Trauma

Straight, No Chaser: The Physical Signs of Child Abuse

abuse-emotional-child-96_2

Given how often this topic is in the news, we must continue to drill certain points home. This Straight, No Chaser provides visual examples of the consequences of child abuse. A child’s body doesn’t care if the wounds were meant to injure or just to punish. The long term effects aren’t limited by family traditions of similar behavior. We need an army to protect children against child abuse. A separate post will discuss the mental signs and consequences of abuse, but to start with, I’d like to help you recognize physical signs I tend to look for to potentially identify victims of abuse.

Symptoms include:

  • Black eyes

physical_2[1]

  • Broken bones that are unusual and unexplained
  • Bruise marks or lashes shaped like hands, fingers, or objects (such as a belt)

child abuse whip marks arm

  • Bruises in areas where normal childhood activities would not usually result in bruising

BRUISES-MISSED-ABUSE

  • Bite marks

child abuse bite marks

  • Bulging soft spot (fontanelle) or separations in an infant’s skull

childabusefontanelle

  • Burn marks, usually seen on the hands, arms, or buttocks

childabusebuttock

  • Choke marks around the neck
  • Cigarette burns on exposed areas or on the genitals

child abuse burns

  • Circular marks around the wrists or ankles (signs of twisting or tying up)
  • Unexplained unconsciousness in an infant

If you ever see such things in children, be suspicious, be involved and get help. There are always ‘explanations’ for why things happen to children, but they too frequently seem to defy logic. Of course you can call 911 or the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). You could save a life.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under General Health and Wellness, Pediatrics/Kids Health, Trauma

Straight, No Chaser: Recognizing Sexual Abuse in Children

childsexabuse

Child. Sexual. Abuse. Those words shouldn’t go together, even on a computer screen. According to the most recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Child Abuse Report, 683,000 children in the U.S. were abused at least once in 2015. There are subtleties in the detection of various forms of abuse. This post offers tips to help you develop a sense that something may be amiss.

This is the third entry in a Straight, No Chaser series on sexual assault (aka sexual violence, rape).

  • Check this Straight, No Chaser, which addresses the definition and scope of sexual assault, including actions to take if you’re a victim of sexual assault or an attempted sexual assault.
  • Check this Straight, No Chaser, which addressed how to lower your risk for sexual assault.
  • Another post will discuss concrete physical and mental consequences of sexual assault.

child_abuse_prevention

The difficulty of diagnosing and prosecuting sexual abuse is more difficult in children than in adults. In many instances the child is unable to articulate or effectively demonstrate what has occurred, and in other instances the child is so mentally and emotionally traumatized that she or he is unable to express what has occurred. In still other instances, the child’s feelings toward a family member (in those cases in which sexual assault is perpetrated by a family member) belie a sense of betrayal, preventing the reporting of episodes.

As such, those charged with detecting and diagnosing sexual abuse in children are left to observe for subtle, often unconscious cues that a child may be a victim and may still be in danger. Look for some of these behaviors in those who might be involved and, please, report any suspicions. The life you save may be your own child’s.

child-abuse-awareness-bottons-08

In a child, emotional or behavioral actions may include the following:

  • Attaches unusually quickly to strangers or adults
  • Attempts suicide
  • Becomes pregnant, particularly if under age 14
  • Displays behavioral extremes, including passivity/aggression or compliant/demanding behavior
  • Displays knowledge of sexual acts inconsistent with one’s age
  • Has a sexually transmitted infection, particularly if younger than 14 years old
  • Has a sudden appetite change
  • Has delayed physical or emotional development
  • Has difficulty walking or sitting
  • Has episodes of nightmares or bedwetting

In adults or other caregiver, actions may include the following: 

  • Constant blaming, belittling and berating the child
  • Controlling and jealous behavior
  • Displaying secretive and isolated behavior
  • Is abnormally protective of the child
  • Limiting the child’s interaction with other children

Please commit the crisis hotline to memory: 800-4-A-CHILD.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Genital/Urinary, Pediatrics/Kids Health, Public Health, Trauma

Straight, No Chaser: Lowering Your Risk of Being Sexually Assaulted

rapestop

Rape occurs in many different situations. Although the stereotype involves a stranger pulling a victim into a dark, isolated place, more common situations involve being assaulted in the home environment by someone known or by a date. These days rapes occur with victims unable to resist and without memory of the assault.

To begin this conversation of how to lower your risk of sexual assault, remember this first:

Never leave your drink unattended, whether on a date or at a club or other social event.

daterapedrugs

This is the second entry in a Straight, No Chaser series on sexual assault (aka sexual violence, rape).

  • Check this Straight, No Chaser, which addresses the definition and scope of sexual assault, including actions to take if you’re a victim of sexual assault or an attempted sexual assault.
  • Another post will discuss concrete physical and mental consequences of sexual assault.
  • Another post will discuss signs of sexual assault in children.

For the many of you who are victims of rape and sexual assault, you are never at fault, no matter where or how it happens. Your mental health moving forward is largely dependent on when and how completely you accept this fact.

rapeprevention

How can I lower my risk of sexual assault?
This information is modified from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Crime Prevention Council. Here are actions you can take to lower your risk of sexual assault. Being prepared to recognize signs and take action is not the same as living in fear or being paranoid. Forewarned is forearmed.

In general
• First and foremost, be aware of your surroundings. Learn to survey your environment as a prelude to avoiding dangerous situations.
• If any circumstance presents that makes you feel uncomfortable, leave. Hone and trust your instincts.
• Be assertive about your personal space. Make it clear that there are limits that are not to be violated. Your first concern shouldn’t be how these boundaries make you look, but your safety.
• Carry your preferred method of protection. Be skilled in your choice and avoid options that can easily be used against you.

At home
• Lock your doors and your windows, even if you’re gone for just a few minutes. The appearance of unforced entry only confuses matters if you’re trying to prosecute an attacker.
• Never prop open self-locking doors.
• Use door guards, including security door chains and partial door stops.
• Never open your door without knowing who is on the other side. Use the door’s peephole to view your visitors.

Out and about
• Walk with confidence. This promotes strength.
• When it comes to using alcohol, know your limits and stick to them.
• Avoid isolated areas such as underground garages, offices after business hours and apartment laundry rooms, especially if you’re alone.
• Avoid walking or jogging alone, especially at night. Vary your route and routine. Exercise and rest in well-traveled, well-lit areas.

Near your car
• Lock your car, even if you’ll only be gone for a few moments. You don’t want to return to find someone hiding in your back seat.
• Have your key ready to use before you reach your car.
• Get a key with an alarm button. Make sure the battery is always strong and the alarm functioning.
• Watch your car keys and don’t put your name and address on the key ring.
• Park in brightly lit areas that are away from wooded or other areas that could easily disguise danger.
• Drive on well-traveled roads and maintain high levels of fuel in your car. Keep your doors and windows locked while driving.
• Fuel your vehicle during the day.
• Never pick up a hitchhiker.
• If you experience car trouble, stay in your vehicle and call for help on your cellular phone. If you don’t have a phone, put the hood up, lock the doors and place banners in scattered sites that say, “Help. Call police.”

date_rape_psa_photo

Prevention in these matters is the smart thing to do. Your best chance to avoid sexual assault is to avoid being places in which a higher risk of assault exists.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Genital/Urinary, Medical Treatment, Mental Health, Trauma

Straight, No Chaser: Sexual Assault (Rape) and What To Do If You’re a Victim

Sexualviolence

In this series on sexual assault (aka sexual violence, rape), I’m going to lean on best practices largely provided by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service. This topic is sensitive enough that nothing needs to be interpreted as subjective.

  • This Straight, No Chaser will address the definition and scope of sexual assault, including actions to take if you’re a victim of sexual assault or an attempted sexual assault.
  • Another post will discuss concrete physical and mental consequences of sexual assault and steps you can take to lower your risk of sexual assault.
  • Another post will discuss signs of sexual assault in children.

The scope of sexual assault is so vast that it’s surprising more isn’t being done to prevent it. Can you imagine the fervor we’d have if 20% of the population had cancer?

  • Nearly 20% (1 in 5) women have been victims of sexual violence at some time in their lives. The rate for men in 1 in 71.
  • It is estimated that 20-25% of college women in the U.S. have experience a rape or rape attempt while in college.
  • When surveyed, 8% of high school students report having been forced to have sex.

These self-reported numbers are generally accepted as underestimates. The stigma, shame, fear of repercussions and unlikelihood of successful prosecution deter many victims of sexual violence from reporting abuse.

 Sexualassaultdef

Is sexual assault as simple as you know it when you see it (figuratively)? Sexual assault and abuse are any sexual activities that you do not agree to, including …

  • Any inappropriate touching of another’s sexual organs
  • Vaginal, anal, or oral penetration and intercourse regardless of “no” or without expressed consent
  • Rape or attempted rape
  • Child molestation

The scope of sexual assault also includes any inappropriate verbalizations or viewing of another person– basically anything that engages another to participate in unwanted sexual contact or attention. The following are included:

  • Voyeurism (someone unknowingly viewing your private sexual acts)
  • Exhibitionism (someone exposes him/herself to you in public)
  • Incest (sexual contact between family members)
  • Sexual harassment

 sexual_assaulthelp

If you are the victim of sexual assault, there are important steps to take immediately:

  • First, get away from the attacker to a safe place as fast as you can.
  • Next, call 911 or the police or go to the emergency room where the staff can call the police and/or arrange for you to file a police report should you so desire.
  • Call a friend or family member you trust.
  • Call a crisis center or a hotline to talk with a counselor if you are experiencing feelings of fear, shame or guilt, all of which are normal after an assault. Emergency room staff will also be able to connect you to a local rape crisis center.
  • Although the urge will be overwhelming to do so, do not wash, comb, or clean any part of your body. Do not change clothes, touch or change anything at the site where the assault occurred. The entirety of your current state is needed evidence, and the emergency room or other hospital staff will need to collect evidence. The evidence obtained from you using a rape kit will include fibers, hairs, saliva, semen, or clothing that the attacker may have left behind.
  • Go to your nearest emergency room as soon as possible. You will need to be examined, treated for any injuries and screened for possible sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and/or pregnancy.

Sexual assault is never the victim’s fault. Help is available but only if you ask. Here is information on services available to you.

  • National Domestic Violence Hotline 800-799-SAFE (7233) or 800-787-3224 (TDD)
  • National Sexual Assault Hotline 800-656-HOPE (4673)

You will also have access to many local resources through your emergency room or police department. The important point is to get to safety and to help.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

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Filed under Genital/Urinary, Infectious Disease, Public Health, Trauma

Straight, No Chaser: Irritable Bowel Syndrome

irritable_bowel11

The irony of the name “irritable bowel syndrome” (IBS) is found in the connection between stress (in some cases, irritability) and symptoms. This can become a vicious cycle. You care about this condition because once you or your loved ones become afflicted, the symptoms involved present an uncomfortable mix of physical and mental discomfort. As you read this Straight, No Chaser, do so with a mind toward overcoming the anxiety associated with and possibly causing symptoms.

What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)? 

IBS is a gastrointestinal (digestive tract) disorder. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract isn’t damaged but symptoms are caused by changes in how the GI tract works. It is important to note that IBS is a group of symptoms that occur together, not a disease. At different points in the past, IBS was called colitis, mucous colitis, spastic colon, nervous colon, and spastic bowel.

How frequent is IBS?

In most studies, estimates of the frequency of IBS range from 10-15 percent. IBS affects about twice as many women as men, and it is most often found in people younger than age 45.

ibs sx

What are the symptoms of IBS?

The most common symptoms of IBS are abdominal pain, often described as cramping. This is typically accompanied with changes in bowel habits. Other symptoms of IBS may include bloating, constipation or diarrhea, passing mucus or feeling that a bowel movement is incomplete.

To specifically meet the criteria for a diagnosis of IBS, the pain or discomfort will be associated with at least two of the following three symptoms:

  • bowel movements that occur more or less often than usual
  • stool that appears less solid and more watery, or harder and more lumpy, than usual
  • bowel movements that improve the discomfort

What causes IBS?

The causes of IBS are not well understood. Current medical evidence points to a combination of physical and mental health problems.

ibs

How is IBS diagnosed?

There is no test to diagnose IBS; it’s not a disease. Your physician will make the diagnosis based on a complete history, a physical exam and exclusion of other diseases. Although some symptoms will have been present for at least six months, IBS is diagnosed when abdominal pain or discomfort has been present at least three times a month for three consecutive months without other disease or injury that could explain the pain.

IBS-STRESS-management

How is IBS treated?

Though IBS does not have a cure, the symptoms can be treated with changes in eating, diet, and nutrition, medications, probiotics and therapies for any mental health issues. Details on management of IBS can be obtained at http://www.sterlingmedicaladvice.com.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Gastrointestinal

Straight, No Chaser: Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

PID1

Straight, No Chaser has discussed several sexually transmitted infections (STIs) at length, including gonorrheachlamydia and herpes. One thing that often gets overlooked or not given enough consideration is the risk of complications that occur when contracting a STI. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is one consideration that should be up front and center as a consideration in your mind (assuming you’re female). If you’re not familiar with the term PID, commit it to memory, as this is a relatively common condition.

PID

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) refers to an infection of the upper genital tract in women. It is usually sexually transmitted. PID is the single most common preventable cause of infertility in the U.S. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); over 750,000 cases of PID occur in the U.S. every year.

Here’s your concern: PID can negatively affect your reproductive organs, including the uterus (womb), fallopian tubes (tubes that carry eggs from the ovaries to the uterus) and ovaries. The inflammation caused by PID scars affects organs and can result in infertility, tubal (ectopic) pregnancy, chronic pelvic pain, abscesses (pus pockets, aka “boils“) and other serious gynecological problems.  Most ominous is the fact that up to 20% of women may become infertile as a result of PID.

As mentioned, PID typically begins as an STI. Among STIs, gonorrhea and chlamydia are the most common causes. Here are additional risk factors for PID.

  • Prior episode of PID
  • Under age 25 – The cervix (opening to the uterus) has greater susceptibility to STIs and thus to PID in this age group.
  • Douching — This can force bacteria from the vagina into the upper reproductive organs.
  • IUD use — In some women, using an intrauterine device (IUD) to prevent pregnancy can also cause PID.
  • Medical care — PID may rarely result from gynecological procedures or surgeries.

There is a pretty significant range in the way PID shows up. You may not have symptoms, or symptoms could be quite severe. Symptoms may include lower abdominal pain, fever and foul-smelling vaginal discharge. You may notice pain with sex or while urinating. Your menstruation may become abnormal.

This may sound odd, but the treatment of PID is much more important than its diagnosis. This is because a diagnosis may be difficult to reach due to the subtlety of symptoms, and the consequences of missing the diagnosis are severe enough that presumptive treatment is commonly done. Early treatment can prevent or limit long-term complications such as infertility and chronic pelvic pain. According to the CDC, without adequate treatment, 20-40% of women with chlamydia and 10-40% of women with gonorrhea may develop PID. Among those with PID, fully one in five (20%) may develop infertility and one in 10 (10%) may develop a tubal (ectopic) pregnancy. Chronic pelvic pain occurs in approximately 18% of cases of PID.

If you are thought to have or are diagnosed with PID, you will need antibiotics. It is critical that you take these until they are all gone. This is not an instance where you should stop taking the pills once you start feeling better. More specifics on the treatment of PID are provided at http://www.sterlingmedicaladvice.com.

What you really want to remember is that prevention is key. The best way to avoid STIs is to abstain from sex or to be in a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with a partner who has been tested and isn’t infected. In addition, correct and consistent use of condoms further reduces your risk of STIs, including chlamydia and gonorrhea.

One more crucial means of protection from PID is early detection. If you think you or your sexual partner may have an STI, get evaluated and treated promptly.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

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Filed under Infectious Disease, Obstetrics and Gynecology