Category Archives: Health Prevention

Straight, No Chaser: What To Do If You Suspect a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD)

It’s been a long and productive sex week here at Straight, No Chaser. We’ve run the gamut of common sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and other genital conditions, and links to many are included within this post. However, many of you have rightfully asked a simple question: “What happens if and when I contract a STI?” This and the next post will look at three scenarios around contracting, managing and living with a STIs.

 STD1 tellapartner

What you should do immediately if you suspect you or your partner has a sexually transmitted infection

  • You first job is to stop the denial. STIs don’t go away on their own. Well, actually herpes does, but it’s more accurate to say it goes into hiding, waiting to return another day. At the first suggestion of any abnormality (e.g. vaginal/penile discharge, the presence of bumps, a rash, warts or ulcers, itching or burning when you urinate, or abnormal smells, etc.), get evaluated. This clearly is an example of it’s better to have it (an evaluation) and not need it than to need it and not have it. STIs cause consequences, including PID (pelvic inflammatory disease), birth defects and any increased incidence of cancer. HPV even causes cancer, and without vaccination, virtually 100% of the sexually active population will obtain it at some point in life.

STD1 women-infertile

  • You must get all your sexual partners evaluated and treated. Ping pong is not just a sport. You getting treated without all of your partners doing so as well is pointless. Even your asymptomatic partners can be carriers of the disease. Sorry folks, but guys are much more likely not to have symptoms even if infected. Don’t let that fact change the reality of who needs to be told and treated (or who could have caused the infection). Not telling your female partners about STIs can have devastating consequences.

std1 hiv

  • You should make a commitment to wearing condoms. Either get over the subjective difference in how sexual intercourse feels with and without condoms, or get more creative to adjust for the difference. The issues are common things happen commonly, and the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. If you have had a STI, you’re more likely to have others in the future. It’s more likely to be in your social network, and you may be the one who is a carrier (of herpes, for example). Given that STIs “hang out” together like a gang (meaning the same individuals infected with one STI are the ones most likely to have others), you want to avoid contract some of the incurable STIs, such as herpes, HIV or HPV.

 std1 testing

What we will do if you suspect you have a STI

  • When you come to your physician’s office or the emergency room with the possibility that a STI exists, or you know you’ve been exposed to one, you will be treated. This is not a situation in which we wait to treat some of the more common conditions, such as gonorrhea or chlamydia. Because of the community, dealing with STIs is more of a “treat now, ask questions later” situation. Besides, many individuals are carriers without the presences of symptoms (particularly those with herpes). I must restate: this is neither the time to be bashful or in denial. If it’s syphilis that’s in question, say so. If you have sufficient symptoms, your medical team will figure it out, but it’s better for you if you already know what the likely culprit is.
  • You should not be offended by the questions you will be asked. Physicians are in the treatment business, not the judging business. Expect to have frank conversations about your sexual habits and preferences, with and without your partner(s) present.

std1 hpv-vaccine

  • If a definitive diagnosis is made for certain conditions (e.g. gonorrheachlamydiasyphilis or PID), you will be treated prior to leaving the emergency room unless you have allergies preventing the use of certain medicines. There are two particular considerations for you after you’ve been treated for a curable STI in an office or ER setting, both regarding your resuming sexual activity. First, if cultures were drawn, you should wait to begin sex until after these results have returned. The cultures will clarify exactly which diseases you have and which antibiotics work against them. Normally this would have been an issue, but antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea is a real thing. Additionally, you should wait to begin sex until all of your current partners have also been treated and cleared. You can and will become reinfected from all STIs on more than one occasion.

The final post in this series discusses managing the presence of an incurable sexually transmitted infection.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Geriatrics/Elderly Care, Health Prevention, Infectious Disease, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Straight, No Chaser: Cervical Cancer – The Sexually Transmitted Cancer

cervical-cancer-awareness

Let’s put this take home message up front: here’s a pretty good demonstration of the value of vaccines. I hope that each of you resolves to get any children you care for vaccinated before they become sexually active.

I want to thank my friend and colleague, Dr. Julius Ellis, noted Ob/Gyn physician for contributing to this post. Let’s start this with two simple statements:

  • Cervical cancer has basically been shown to be caused by an infection.
  • There soon will be no reason that anyone has to have cervical cancer.

female reproductive system

As a reminder, the cervix is the lower and narrow end of the uterus that connects the vagina to the upper part of the uterus (i.e. the womb). Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the US.

In 2018, it is estimated that:

  • 13,240 women in the United States will be diagnosed with cervical cancer.
  • 4,170 women in the United States will die from cervical cancer.

Fortunately, over the last 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly, largely due to Pap tests. The even better news is the opportunity exists to virtually eradicate the disease. Cervical cancer is highly preventable because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.

HPV oral

Yes, cervical cancer is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), and the most common STI is now known to be caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Some of you will recognize HPV as a cause of genital warts. This means if you ever develop warts, go get checked immediately (another good reason to do this is because genital syphilis may also present as warts). Even more importantly, certain HPV strains have been shown to cause virtually all cervical and anal cancers. HPV also causes some cancers of the vagina, penis, and oropharynx (a certain part of the throat—and yes, this is what Michael Douglas was referencing about having obtained throat cancer by performing oral sex).

Early on, cervical cancer may not cause signs and symptoms, but advanced cervical cancer may cause bleeding or discharge from the vagina, either of which may be persistent or abnormal from similar episodes you’ve had in the past. If you have any of these signs, see your physician for an evaluation of this and other possible causes of these symptoms.

Am I at risk for HPV? How do you get this?

HPV STD

Everyone having sex or who has ever had sex is at risk for HPV. In fact, nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex, but also through oral sex and genital-to-genital contact without intercourse. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners even if and when the infected person has no signs or symptoms. It’s important to know there’s a big difference between obtaining the HPV virus and obtaining cancer from having the HPV virus.

If I get genital warts, will I get cancer?

HPV genital warts

Not necessarily, but the possibility is high enough that you need to get treated. Most HPV infections actually resolve on their own. It’s the ones that linger that pose particular concern.

If I do have warts, what increases my risks for these cancers?

hpv risks

Smoking, a weakened immune system, having had many children (for increased risk of cervical cancer), long-term oral contraceptive use (for increased risk of cervical cancer), and poor oral hygiene (for increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer) all increase the risk for developing cancer after a HPV infection.

How do I get this and how do I prevent it?

HPV

The most reliable way to prevent infection with HPV is abstinence, avoiding any skin-to-skin oral, anal, or genital contact with another. If you are sexually active, a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to prevent HPV infection. However, because of the lack of symptoms, it’s hard to know whether a partner is currently infected with HPV. Use of condoms reduces the transmission of HPV between partners, although areas not covered by a condom can still be infected.

HPV vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two HPV vaccines, branded as Gardasil (for the prevention of cervical, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer, precancerous lesions, and genital warts in these areas) and Cervarix (for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous cervical lesions caused by HPV). Both vaccines are highly effective, but neither has been approved for prevention of penile or oropharyngeal cancer. And yes, it’s safe and effective as young as age 9, although the Center for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends vaccination between ages 11–14. You must contact your physician for additional details on these important medications.

How do I treat HPV infections?

There’s no treatment for HPV itself, but the problems HPV causes can be treated. We’ll address the two major ones:

  • Genital warts may be treated topically by you or a healthcare provider. If not treated, they may multiply, go away, or stay the same.
  • Cervical cancer may be treated by your gynecologist, but be warned: Prevention is best, and early detection gives you the best chance for the best outcomes. Continue those annual exams.

There will soon come a time when all boys and girls are receiving vaccinations at around ages 11–12, and cervical cancer (in particular) will become a rare entity. That only happens if you get your family immunized. The science is in. There’s no good reasons left to wait.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Health Prevention, Hematology & Oncology/Blood Disorders/Cancer, Infectious Disease, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Straight, No Chaser: Advanced Maternal Age

advanced-maternal-age-tt

Times have changed. Marriages are increasingly career-focused, and couples more and more choose to have babies later in life. It is helpful that these decisions can now be aided by recent innovations in medicine regarding fertility. Unfortunately, changes in societal norms don’t remove risks inherent in the human condition. Advanced Maternal Age is a medical consideration for any woman considering childbirth after age 35. The bottom line is advanced maternal age comes with risks. If you or a loved one is considering childbirth after age 35, you need to be aware of these risks and how to minimize them. These include the following.

It likely will take longer to get pregnant.

If pregnant, you will have an increased risk of miscarriage.

If successfully pregnant, you’re more likely to have any of several medical conditions, including the following:

  • Gestational diabetes
  • Pregnancy-induced hypertension
  • Placental previa (in which the “afterbirth” material can inadvertently cover all or part of the uterine opening, causing bleeding and a need for C-section)

Halle Berry takes daughter Nahla for her passport photo in Beverly Hills, California. Pictured: Halle Berry Ref: SPL549901 240513 Picture by: Headlinephoto / Splash News Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles:310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 870-934-2666 photodesk@splashnews.com

If you successfully deliver, your child is more likely to be at risk for any of several medical conditions, including the following:

  • Down Syndrome and other chromosomal birth defects, causing abnormalities in the transmission of heredity information via the genes)
  • Low birth weight and prematurity

janetama

Even though you can never eliminate the above risks, you can reduce them. Consider the following among the list of healthy choices you should make to give yourself the best change to have a healthy baby at an advanced maternal age. All of these recommendations should be adapted in conjunction with your obstetrician.

Get prenatal care before you actually get pregnant and keep it during your pregnancy. You will need to discuss your personalized risks, your health profile, the correct strategy for weight gain, and any prenatal testing that may be necessary.

Eat a nutritious diet, including recommended amounts of calcium, folic acid, iron, Vitamin D, and a daily prenatal vitamin. These dietary habits should begin well before you become pregnant.

Stay physically active. Health basics are even more important during this time.

Getting pregnant at an advanced maternal age is a serious decision. Approach it with the consideration and caution it deserves.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Health Prevention, Obstetrics and Gynecology

The Straight, No Chaser Guide to Health Screenings for Women

This Straight, No Chaser looks at current health screening recommendations. Whether it’s an ounce of prevention or early detection, you’re much better off knowing what your health status is. Today, let’s focus on women’s health. Women are much more likely to have encountered a physician, so that results in longer life expectancies, but to be clear, here’s what you should be protecting against. Please remember: these recommendations are in effect regardless of “how you feel!”

health-screening-womens-screening-wpahs 

Health Screening For Women – Ages 40 to 64

Blood Pressure Screening:

  • At age 40, you should have your blood pressure checked at least once a year. If you’re seeing a physician at any point during the year, this will be done. Be sure to ask for and document your numbers. If you aren’t seeing a physician, these days local pharmacies and various other opportunities through communities will allow you to stay aware of your blood pressure.
  • If you’re getting it checked on your own, remember the following numbers: if the top number (systolic) is above 120 or the lower number is more than 80, you should schedule an appointment with a health care provider.

Breast Exam

  • Although opinions are evolving about the benefits of breast self-exams in finding cancer or saving lives, it still remains the case that the benefits of early detection without much risk in performing exams render monthly exams harmless. You should discuss this with your physician, and contact him or her immediately if you notice any change in your breasts.

Cholesterol Screening

  • Cholesterol levels should be checked no less than every 5 years.

Colon Cancer Screening

  • All men between 50-75 should be screened along one of these guidelines:
    • A stool test for blood every year
    • A flexible sigmoidoscopy test every 5 years with a stool test for blood every 3 years
    • A colonoscopy at least every 10 years, and perhaps more often with risk factors such as ulcerative colitis, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or colorectal adenomas
  • Men under 50 years may need screening if a strong family history of colon cancer, polyps, inflammatory bowel disease exists.

Diabetes Screening

  • After age 45, all men should be screened every 3 years.
  • If your blood pressure is more than 135/80 mm Hg, or you have other risk factors for diabetes, you may be checked at any age.
  • If you are overweight, you likely will be screened at younger ages; ask if you should be checked whenever you engage the healthcare system.

Dental Exam

  • At these ages, you should be visiting the dentist once or twice a year for an exam, cleaning and screening for oral cancer.

Eye Exam

  • At ages 40-54: an exam every 2-4 years
  • At ages 55-64: an exam every 1-3 years
  • Exams may be needed more frequently if you have visual difficulties or a significant risk for glaucoma. If you have diabetes, you need an annual eye exam.

Heart Disease Prevention

  • At these ages, an examination is needed to quantify your risks for heart disease.
  • When you have a physical examination, specifically ask if you should be taking a daily aspirin.

womens-health-screening-h-img-goals-for-women

Immunizations

  • Influenza: you should get a flu shot every year.
  • Shingles (herpes zoster): you may get a shingles vaccine once after age 60.
  • Tetanus-diphtheria: you should get a booster ever 10 years, assuming you’ve received the primary vaccine series – if not, you’ll need that first.

Lung Cancer Screening

  • You will receive annual screening for lung cancer if between ages 55-80 and you have a 30 “pack-year” smoking history and if you either are a current smoker or have quit within the last 15 years.

Mammogram

  • Ages 40-49: Your physician may or may not choose to have a mammogram performed every 1-2 years.
  • Ages 50-75: You should have an exam performed every 1-2 years (frequency based on your risk factors).
  • Mammograms may be recommended at earlier ages with strong family histories (e.g. mother or sister) of breast cancer.

Osteoporosis Screening

  • If you are under age 65 and have risk factors for osteoporosis, you should be screened.
  • All women over 50 years of age should have a bone density test after a fracture.

Pelvic Exam and Pap Smear

  • Women should have a Pap smear every 3 years, unless your physician is performing both a Pap smear and a human papilloma virus (HPV) test. If so, you are likely to be tested every 5 years. If you have had a total hysterectomy you will no longer receive Pap smears in the absence of a previous diagnosis of cervical cancer.
  • If you are having high risk sexual activity you should be screened for chlamydia, gonorrhea and other considerations at the physician’s discretion.

Physical Exam:

  • Yes, this is a very important and basic screening tool. Every year if not more often with every exam, your height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, temperature and respiratory (breathing) rate) should be checked.
  • Your annual exam will also assess your risks due to alcohol, tobacco and other illicit drug use, depression, inadequate diet and exercise, and improper use of seat belts and smoke detectors. You should expect to receive a skin exam as part of your physical exam.

If this seems like a lot, well, you’re worth it. You can always print this out and compare notes with your physician; odds are they’ll have all of this covered. The most important thing is to get checked!

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under General Health and Wellness, Health Prevention

Straight, No Chaser Vlog: Stroke – How to Save a Life

The Straight, No Chaser vlog (video blog) series presents “health care basics” to keep you safe, healthy and out of the emergency room. Today’s topic is stroke (cerebrovascular accidents). Please take 60 seconds to learn how to save a life. It may even be your own.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.jeffreysterlingbooks.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Health Prevention, Neurology

Straight, No Chaser: The Health Benefits of Red Wine

It’s the start of a new week, and we’re coming off a lot of Straight, No Chaser posts on alcohol, so let’s just address some questions you’ve asked about the benefits of alcohol.

So alcohol is good for me now (especially after all those other blog posts)?

red-wine-health-benefits

Red wine has been known to provide specific health benefits for at least 10 years now. Of course, you have to interact with it in a certain way to receive these benefits. More on that in a bit, but yes, moderate alcohol consumption (especially red wine) does have a direct, beneficial effect on the heart.

Can you be more specific?

red-wine-and-heart-health

Ok. The skin and seeds of red grapes contain substances called flavonoids. Flavonoids reduce bad cholesterol (LDL) production, increase good cholesterol (HDL) production and reduce blood clotting, all of which are significant risks leading to many instances of heart disease. Each of these actions by flavonoids independently reduce the risk of heart disease.

Ok. So how much wine should I be drinking per day? 

If you’re drinking “for the health benefits,” a four-ounce serving is generally what’s recommended for women, and 4-8 ounces works for men. Higher levels of daily consumption than this introduce health risks that offset any benefits.

Is this true for all wines?

redwine-ecg

Unfortunately, not to the same extent. Here are two simple (and admittedly overly simplistic) rules regarding the number of healthy flavonoids in wine.

  • Red wines are better than whites.
  • Bitter red wines are better than sweet wines.

The best red wines have been found to be Cabernet Sauvignon, Petit Syrah and Pinot Noir.

So should I start drinking if I don’t already?

red-wine-ink-heart

Probably not. Most drinkers don’t have the discipline to limit their consumption to just one 4-8 ounce serving of red wine a day, and alcohol comes with too many other health risks to offset the benefits of not drinking at all. This is especially true in those with existing health conditions such as hypertension, pancreatitis, depression, high cholesterol/triglycerides or congestive heart failure. Besides, grape juice has been shown to offer the same benefits!

Enjoy your week, just remember (as I always say): good health isn’t found at the bottom of a bottle!

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Cardiology/Heart, Health Prevention, Toxicology/Drugs

Straight, No Chaser: Treating Your Seasonal Allergies / Hay Fever

hay fever solution

You’re miserable from seasonal allergies (aka hay fever, allergic rhinitis)? You’ve seemingly tried everything, and nothing seems to help? Did you read the introductory post on hay fever? Good. Now, let’s do a Straight, No Chaser look at your treatment options.

I want to start with a very simple point that’s more important that everything else that will follow.

People who have allergies will have allergic attacks.

Understand that. Accept that. Now let’s deal with it.

allergy prevention

The goal in addressing seasonal allergies is prevention. The way your body works is simple. If you are exposed to a pollen or other substance the body interprets as a potential danger (an allergen), it will generate a defense to fight it. The suffering you sometimes feel is the byproduct of that fight. Furthermore, when you are subsequently exposed to the allergen, you will generate a stronger response, as your immune system is now primed for the fight.

All of this means that avoidance of these “triggers” is the key to your wellbeing. Everything else is compensation after the fact, which, in some cases, work counter to what the body may actually need at a certain point in time. Start by focusing on identifying your triggers and practicing avoidance.

  • During pollen season, stay indoors on especially hot, dry and windy days.
  • Don’t be afraid to wear a mask.

There are many treatment options. Besides avoidance, strategies involve treating symptoms and reducing the immune response.

Symptomatic Relief

  • For many, a nasal wash sufficiently eliminates mucus from the nose.
  • Antihistamines are a good place to start, and there are over the counter options. Be mindful of whether or not the one you’re selecting makes you drowsy. If so, act accordingly. (E.g., don’t operate heavy machinery while taking them.)
  • Nasal steroid sprays (corticosteroids) are the most effective treatment for allergic reaction, but may not be as effective if you’re not taking them continuously. Steroids are anti-inflammatory agents; that’s how they combat allergic rhinitis, which is an inflammation of the nose.
  • Many people reach for decongestants first because the nasal stuffiness is so annoying, but be advised: You should not take these for more than three days at a time. If the need persists, you should obtain medical attention.

hay fever

Reducing the Immune Response

  • A class of medicines called leukotriene inhibitors block the substances released by your immune system. These substances are problematic because they also produce symptoms.
  • If symptoms either get incapacitating or you can’t avoid your triggers, you may be a candidate for immunotherapy (aka allergy shots). This involves desensitization to the pollen by receiving incrementally stronger exposure until your body can adapt to the exposure.

The point of it all is you should focus on prevention by avoidance and work with your physician to address symptoms and your body’s response to them.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

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Filed under Environmental, General Health and Wellness, Health Prevention