Tag Archives: There are 72 Hours in a Day

Straight, No Chaser: Cigar Smoking

cigar-and-golf

It’s the latest, greatest, coolest past-time.  Endorsed and practiced by celebrities the world over, cigar smoking has clearly and successfully marketed itself as a convenience of the successful.  Even the notion that the ‘best’ cigars are forbidden fruit (i.e. come from Cuba) adds to the allure if and when you’re able to wrap your lips around one.  I wasn’t surprised, but it’s worth noting that beyond the success stories received from those of you who have successfully stopped cigarette smoking, the next set of questions involved whether cigar smoking is a safe alternative.

Since you have little old me taking on an $8 billion a year industry and the wrath of the very passionate, I have no recourse but to arm myself with some data – cold, hard facts.

  • 49% of all cigars sold are large cigars.  A single large cigar contains as much tobacco as an entire pack of cigarettes.
  • Cigar use is on the rise, with over 13 million people identifying as current users.
  • 15% of male students in grades 9-12 are current users.
  • African-Americans have the highest rate of cigar smoking (among ethnicities/races), with a 7.7% user rate.

You want to know the effects of cigar smoking?  Let’s cut to the chase.

mouth_cancer_cr

Here are the five “SURGEON GENERAL WARNING” text-only labels, one of which must be displayed on all cigar packaging and advertisements.  This is done on a rotating basis.

  1. Cigar Smoking Can Cause Cancers Of The Mouth and Throat, Even if You Do Not Inhale.
  2. Cigar Smoking Can Cause Lung Cancer and Heart Disease.
  3. Tobacco Use Increases the Risk of Infertility, Stillbirth and Low Birth Weight.
  4. Cigars Are Not A Safe Alternative To Cigarettes.
  5. Tobacco Smoke Increases The Risk of Lung Cancer And Heart Disease, Even In Nonsmokers. 

Beyond what the Surgeon General requires, here are some additional facts:

  • All tobacco smoke contains more than 60 chemicals that can cause cancer, and cigar smoke is no exception.
  • Regular cigar smoking increases your risk for the following cancers: lung, esophagus, larynx (your voice box), and oral cavity (lips, tongue, mouth and throat).
  • Cigar smoking is linked to gum disease and tooth decay and loss.
  • In addition to lung cancer, heavy cigar smoking increases the risk for emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

Fidel-Castro-smoking-ciga-001

The bottom line?

Cigar smoking is not a safe alternative to cigarette smoking.

There is no level of cigar smoking that does not pose health risks.

As always, it’s not my chore to convince you to do or not to do; freedom of choice is a beautiful thing.  That said, be advised that if you read this blog, you will be an informed consumer.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Straight, No Chaser: The Frustration of Acute Bronchitis

bronchitis

Imagine what it looks like when someone gets hit in the jaw. There’s the redness, swelling from excess fluid in the area, warmth and pain. Those are the components of inflammation. Now imagine those symptoms in your lungs as you’re trying to breathe and deliver oxygen to the rest of your body. Off the top of my head, I can’t think of a more frustrating diagnosis than bronchitis for both patients and physicians alike. I’ll get into the reasons for that soon enough, but a bit of explanation is definitely in order.

bronchitis1

Bronchitis is inflammation of a portion of the airways (the bronchi). Far and away, bronchitis is seen in smokers and after a viral, upper airway infection (e.g., a cold, the flu). In that last statement I slipped in two words that create the frustration regarding this condition: viral and smokers. There’s still more to come on what that means for you.

bronchitis-treatment-mammqctr

Everyone reading this has suffered from bronchitis at some point, and, based on what’s already been said, it’s easy to figure out what the symptoms would be. The inflammation of your airways leads to a cough, shortness of breath, chest discomfort, a mild fever and fatigue. If you have asthma, you’re likely to start wheezing. Another major source of frustration is even after the bronchitis has gone away or been treated, the cough stays around for up to an additional four weeks. This gives many the impression that they’re still sick, and leads them to demand that the doctor do something to “fix it.”

coughing-up-blood

There are a few more problems dealing with or treating acute bronchitis.

  • Bronchitis is actually the most common cause of coughing up blood. Coughing up blood or producing blood-tinged mucus tends to make people anxious, and they often start thinking of things like cancer. That train of thought makes some people want to take every test possible to rule out cancer, “just to be sure.” Now your physician knows better and isn’t going to do that unless you have additional symptoms or tell a story more consistent with cancer. That often leads to a lot of frustration and sometimes anger.

bronchitis smokers-lungs_1

  • Bronchitis is most often caused by smokers who don’t stop smoking even while they’re suffering. It is a very tense conversation (from both sides) when you return to the ER five days after being seen and diagnosed with bronchitis, and you’re complaining because you’re not better. Folks, even if your physician puts out the fire, if you continue to relight the match, it’ll continue to blaze.

bronchitis abx

  • Bronchitis is not pneumonia, which is an infection of the lungs. In most cases where bronchitis has an infectious cause, that cause is a virus. Viruses do not respond to antibiotics. Your physician understands that you’re sick. Just because you’re sick and coughing, that doesn’t mean you need antibiotics or that antibiotics will cure you. Inappropriate antibiotic use is not without long-term complications that you should want to avoid. In most cases, assuming you remove the source of inflammation (e.g., cigarette or cigar smoke, dust, allergens), your symptoms will improve on their own within a week, and all you need is supportive therapy such as cough, fever and pain medicines along with fluids and rest. You must also practice good hygiene to avoid spreading any viruses that may be causing the bronchitis.
  • What complicates this is when your weakened state and continued exposure to whatever is causing the inflammation allows a bacterial infection to land on top of your bronchitis. Ask your physician if it’s possible that this is what is going on. S/he will know how to proceed, including potentially using antibiotics.

bronchitis and cigarettes

  • In a majority of cases, a diagnosis of bronchitis will be a big source of frustration for patients because, from the physician’s standpoint, bronchitis is an easily diagnosed condition due to an obvious cause (such as a cold or cigarette smoking). As such, your physician is likely not to order a lot—or any—tests. Now from the patient’s standpoint, don’t you just hate going to the physician’s office or ER when you’re sick and “nothing” gets done? Well, especially in an ER setting, tests are not used to make diagnoses. They’re meant to be ordered if the results will change the management of the condition or might lead to a change in what is done with you (e.g., admit you to the hospital). Most often, that’s just not going to be the case with bronchitis. Now if after 3–5 days symptoms haven’t improved, you’ve stopped smoking and the mucus you’re coughing up looks a certain way, there’s plenty that will be done differently in most cases.

Please don’t take any of this to mean that you shouldn’t be seen for bronchitis. My effort today is to temper your expectations and help you appreciate what your physician is looking for and thinking. Here are some specific signs and symptoms to look for when you’re suffering from acute bronchitis that indicates a level of seriousness warranting prompt attention:

  • You have a documented high fever or have had a documented fever for more than three days.
  • You have greenish or bloody mucus, or you are coughing up only blood.
  • You have shaking chills.
  • You have chest pain or shortness of breath.
  • You have heart or lung disease (such as asthma or COPD/emphysema).

Over time, bronchitis can become chronic if the source of the inflammation isn’t removed. If you find yourself with ongoing symptoms for over three months, you will fall into a different category known as chronic bronchitis. Your physician will need to address additional considerations for you.

So often patients with bronchitis are looking for a “quick fix.” As is often the case, that fix is to be found in prevention. In this case, good hygiene and avoidance of smoke and other lung irritants can save you a lot of the shortness of breath and chest pain associated with bronchitis (pun intended).

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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From the Health Library of SterlingMedicalAdvice.com: “If I stop smoking, what does this do to my risk for heart disease and stroke?”

Stop Smoking

 There are immediate and long term benefits to smoking cessation that extend beyond just lowering your risk for lung cancer. I challenge you to consider the following regarding lowering your risk for heart disease and stroke, and I’d bet you’d make the change to make yourself healthier.
  • Within 1 year of smoking cessation, your excess risk of coronary heart disease, heart attack, and stroke has dropped to less than half that of a smoker.
  • Within 5–15 years after stopping, your risk of stroke has declined to that of a non-smoker.
  • At 15 years after stopping, your risk of coronary heart disease is that of a person who has never smoked.

You can do it. There are many great reasons to do so. You likely call some of these reasons family and friends.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Cardiology/Heart, General Health and Wellness

Straight, No Chaser: COPD

COPDer

November is COPD Awareness Month. You already know a lot about COPD without realizing it or even having to think about it. You’ve seen patients walking around with the oxygen tanks or tubes in their noses. However, that’s just the extreme. COPD is the third or fourth leading cause of death in the US depending on the source, with millions of individuals diagnosed. You also know COPD and cancers are why your doctors always warn you against smoking in any form. You know smoking is the leading cause of this. This Straight, No Chaser provides a brief overview of COPD and answers some key questions.

emphysema

What Is COPD?

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a lung disease that makes it hard to breathe and advances in severity over time.

Appreciate that air goes from your mouth or nose through the windpipe (trachea) through several branches of airways, eventually connecting to blood vessels meant to carry oxygen to the organs of your body. These same blood vessels drop off waste gas known as carbon dioxide, which we exhale with each breath out. In COPD, less air flows in and out of the airways because of one or more of the following:

  • The airways and air sacs lose their elasticity. Elasticity is the stretchiness your lungs need to fill up with and push out air. In COPD, these sacs act less like a balloon and more like a lead pipe.
  • The airways make more mucus than usual, which clog them and make breathing more difficult. The inflammation caused by smoke and other irritants produce mucus. It’s not a good thing when instead of breathing air, you’re attempting to breathe a smoke-filled swamp of snot-like material.
  • The walls of the airways become thick and inflamed. Over time, inflammation can cause permanent changes in the walls of the airways to compensate for the environment you’ve created.
  • The walls between many of the air sacs are destroyed. Ongoing inflammation overwhelms the body’s ability to repair itself, and eventually sheets of tissue in your airways are destroyed beyond repair, providing you with less tissue to exchange oxygen from the lungs to the blood vessels that carry oxygen through the body.

COPD

What causes COPD? 

Cigarette smoking is far and away the leading cause of COPD. Most of those with COPD are current or former smokers. Heredity, childhood respiratory infections, and long-term exposure to other lung irritants, such as air pollution, chemical fumes, or dust may contribute to or cause COPD.

COPD pix

I’ve been told I have bronchitis. Is that the same thing?

There’s acute bronchitis, and there’s chronic bronchitis. In the US, COPD refers to two separate but similar conditions, emphysema and chronic bronchitis; most with COPD have both conditions. Now if you have acute bronchitis, it means something (like and likely cigarette smoke) is currently inflaming your airways. Over time this can permanently damage the airways and produce an ongoing state of inflammation – chronic bronchitis – with airway wall thickening and increased mucus production within the lungs. Let the smoker beware.

How is this different from emphysema?

In emphysema, the walls between many of the air sacs are damaged, losing their shape and elasticity. This damage also can destroy the walls of the air sacs, leading to fewer, larger and less efficient air sacs instead of many more efficient tiny ones. If this happens, the amount of gas exchange in the lungs is reduced, meaning you’re not getting enough oxygen in you and enough carbon dioxide out of you.

copd sx

What are some symptoms of COPD?

COPD can cause coughing with mucus production, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, decreased ability to exert yourself and walk around. Even more symptoms may develop as a result of inadequate oxygen supply and inadequate carbon dioxide disposal.

How can I know if I have COPD?

One big problem with COPD is many have the disease and don’t know it until it starts becoming quite advanced. It’s safe to assume that if you’re a smoker and have difficulty breathing, you’re experiencing changes to your airways that aren’t in your best interest. You are advised to get evaluated. You are best advised to remove yourself from the source of the inflammation (in other words, stop smoking).

How does COPD affect my life?

For starters, it shortens it. It also markedly increases your cancer risk. At some point all the damage and changes to your lungs is going to cause some abnormality. Given this is the area you use to breathe, deliver oxygen to your organs and eliminate toxins from your body, all manners of things can go wrong, and they often do. COPD is a chronic, progressive disease. You may or may not pick up on the slow creep of diminishing ability to perform routine activities, or maybe you’ll just attribute them to aging (COPD occurs most often in middle-aged to elderly individuals). Once severe enough, COPD may prevent you from doing even basic activities like walking, breathing without difficulty, or taking care of yourself.

What’s the cure for this? 

Here’s the frightening part: we’re talking about irreversible lung tissue change and destruction. Once layers of your airways have been ripped out (figuratively), they aren’t coming back. The damage is done. Prevention is your best defense.

COPD treatment-chart

So how is it treated?

There is no real treatment without removing the trigger feeding the ongoing inflammation. In other words, you’ll have to stop smoking to attempt to arrest the progression. Additional measures involve support.

  • Supplemental oxygen may be needed to deliver enough oxygen to the tissues as an effort to combat the destruction and inflammation of tissue meant to facilitate oxygen exchange.
  • Medicines to reduce the inflammation and mucus may be prescribed.
  • Medicines to better open the airways past the clogging caused by inflammation and mucus may be prescribed.

Your physician will discuss these and other options. The truth is COPD has no cure. Once you’re discovered to have COPD, efforts switch to slowing the progression and implementing measures to improve the quality of your life within the parameters defined by the advancement of your disease.

Here is a short video from the National Institutes of Health.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

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Filed under Respiratory/Lungs

Straight, No Chaser: Lung Health – Know The Signs of Danger

I would suggest you should be in complete awe of your lungs. Did you know you take over 20,000 breaths a day? Your lungs bring air into your body and eliminates waste (carbon dioxide) when you exhale. The lungs transfer oxygen into the bloodstream and launches it throughout body’s cells as life-sustaining fuel. This Straight, No Chaser skips ahead in the process of lung function to discuss the relevance of everyday symptoms you experience as signals of danger.

If you have any of these warning signs or symptoms, discuss them with your physician as soon as possible.

chronic cough

Chronic Cough – In this definition, chronic means the cough has been present for at least a month.  This is an important early symptom and should not be ignored – smokers, that means you.

shortness-of-breath

Shortness of Breath – To be clear: you expect to be short of breath after you exercise or otherwise exert yourself. The shortness of breath that should be particularly concerning doesn’t go away after exercising or occurs after little or no exertion. The feeling that it is hard to breathe in or out is also a warning sign and is also indicative of respiratory illness.

mucus asthma

Chronic Mucus Production – Mucus (aka sputum or phlegm) is produced by the airways as a defense response to infections or irritants.  Ongoing production for more than a month could indicate lung disease.

wheezing

Wheezing – Wheezing is often described as noisy or musical breathing and is a sign that something blocking your lungs’ airways or making them too narrow, such as a physical obstruction, inflammation or increased mucus production.

coughing-up-blood

Coughing up Blood – If you are coughing up blood, the blood may be coming from your lungs or higher up in your respiratory tract. It is a sign of a health problem.

chest-pain chronic

Chronic Chest Pain – Chest pain lasting more than a month should be taken as a warning sign. Lung involvement is more likely if it is associated with worsening while breathing or coughing.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Straight, No Chaser: Great American Smokeout – Quick Tips to START Smoking Cessation

great-american-smokeout

The Great American Smokeout is a great time to get serious about smoking cessation. Don’t wait to make it a New Year’s resolution. Do it now. Can’t do it now? Do it Monday. In fact, do it every Monday. It’s a fight. If you fall down, start it back up again. It’s the fight of your life (or should I say for your life)!

Try all of these tips to help you:

  • If you decide to quit after your current (last) pack, throw away one cigarette for every one you smoke.
  • Count (figuratively or literally) all the money you’re saving by not smoking.
  • Throw away (not give away) all cigarettes, cigars, matches, lighters, humidors, cigar cutters and anything else you associate with smoking. You’ll realize how sad it is if and when you find yourself rummaging through the garbage to get a fix.
  • Tell everyone (loudly) that you’ve quit. Empower them to help and hold you accountable. Enlist another smoker friend to go through the journey with you.
  • If you do fall off the wagon, smoke a different cigarette brand. Odds are you won’t like it as much, and that will help combat the natural ease you have with smoking.
  • Contact your physician and ask for help.

smokinghard-yes

Here’s a marvelous best-practices schemata of appropriate interplay between a physician and a patient trying to stop smoking.

smoking cessation As

If your physician and you decide to place you on a patch or otherwise medicate you, follow instructions carefully and precisely.

smokingcessation1

More tips:

  • Practice deep breathing. Part of the euphoria of smoking is nothing more than the physiologic sensations produced by deep inhalations.
  • Keep other things in your mouth. Mints and chewing gum (low-calorie) are great. Brushing your teeth also serves many purposes. Drinking water when you want to smoke will often remove the urge.
  • Make it past the first day. Then make it past the first week.

smoking surgeon general cessation

I personally love the START method, which includes several of the above methods. Let me know if it works for any of you.

S: Set a quit date.

T: Tell your friends, family and associates that you’re quitting, and enlist their help.

A: Anticipate and act on the plan you’ve set and challenges you’ll meet.

R: Remove (trash) cigarettes, cigar and other paraphernalia from your environment.

T: Talk with your physician about options and additional support.

For those of you affected (either first or second-hand), this is huge and important. I really wish you all the best. I welcome any comments or questions.

smoking the end

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under General Health and Wellness, Respiratory/Lungs

Straight, No Chaser: Does Cuba Hold the Key to Lung Cancer Treatment and Prevention?

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For many, some of the first things that come to mind when you think of Cuba are smoking and cigars. For many others, the one of first things that come to mind when you think of cigars is cancer. As such, lung cancer is the fourth-leading cause of death in Cuba. Given that necessity is often the mother of invention (and given Cuba’s outstanding public health system), it stands to reason that Cuba might be at the forefront when it comes to advancing the search for a cure for cancer.

In the medical news (and in the category of important stuff that’s actually going on but you aren’t paying attention to), is a Cuban-developed lung cancer vaccine called CimaVax. Imagine if you will: a potential powerful deterrent to the most common form of lung cancer may have existed 90 miles off the shores of the US for 25 years but has been unavailable to citizens due to the US-Cuban trade embargo. Sounds like a good enough reason to normalize relations all by itself, you think?

cuba vax

Here’s what we know about CimaVax at this point:

  • It’s been researched for 25 years in Cuba and Europe.
  • It’s been available to Cubans since 2011.
  • It’s been used to treat 5,000 worldwide.
  • Research, including that published in the US (Journal of Clinical Oncology), has shown CimaVax to be safe, with no significant side effects.
  • Research has shown it to especially increase survival in study participants younger than 60 years old.

To be clear, CimaVax is not a cure for cancer; what it’s doing is blocking a hormone that causes lung cancer growth. It is thought that this strategy will also prove beneficial in the fight against breast, colorectal, head/neck, ovarian and prostate cancers, so in the field of oncology (study of cancer), this is a really big deal.

cuba vax1

What’s next is applying the full scrutiny of the scientific method here in the U.S. What’s possible is within a few years, we may have access to what would unquestionably be one of the biggest tools in the fight against cancer this side of prevention. Here hoping. Sometimes good politics actually do make for great public health.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Health Prevention, Hematology & Oncology/Blood Disorders/Cancer, Respiratory/Lungs