Category Archives: Pediatrics/Kids Health

Tips to Avoid Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexpected

sids reduce risk

Whether you’re expecting, a parent or even a grandparent, most have heard of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). What you’re really concerned about is Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID); SIDS is the leading cause of this category. SUID is defined as sudden and unexpected deaths in infants less than 1 year of age whose causes are not immediately apparent. This represents approximately 4,000 infant deaths per year in the U.S. The three most frequently reported causes of SUID are SIDS, cause unknown, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Approximately half of SUID cases are due to SIDS. This Straight, No Chaser post provides tips for you modified from recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP); these tips are meant to help you reduce the risk of SIDS and SUID in your home.Consider these tips applicable for the first year:

sids back to sleep

  • Place your baby to sleep on his back for every sleep and nap.
  • Place your baby to sleep on a firm sleep surface. Never put your baby to sleep on a chair, sofa, waterbed, cushion, or sheepskin.
  • If your baby falls asleep in a car safety seat, stroller, swing, infant carrier, or infant sling he should be moved to a firm sleep surface as soon as possible.

SIDS wrong sleep position

  • Do not use a crib that is broken or missing parts, or has drop-side rails. 
  • Cover you baby’s mattress with a fitted sheet. Do not put blankets or pillows between the mattress and the fitted sheet.SIDS black baby
  • Keep soft objects, loose bedding, or any objects that could increase the risk of entrapment, suffocation, or strangulation out of the crib. Pillows, quilts, comforters, sheepskins, bumper pads, and stuffed toys can cause your baby to suffocate.

sids babyinbassinetnexttoparents

  • Place your baby to sleep in the same room where you sleep but not the same bed. Keep the crib or bassinet within an arm’s reach of your bed. You can easily watch or breastfeed your baby by having your baby nearby. Babies who sleep in the same bed as their parents are at risk of SIDS, suffocation, or strangulation. Parents can roll onto babies during sleep or babies can get tangled in the sheets or blankets.

sids and breastfeeding

  • Breastfeed as much and for as long as you can. Studies show that breastfeeding your baby can help reduce the risk of SIDS.
  • Schedule and go to all well-child visits. Your baby will receive important immunizations. Recent evidence suggests that immunizations may have a protective effect against SIDS.
  • Keep your baby away from smokers and places where people smoke. Keep your car and home smoke-free. Don’t smoke inside your home or car and don’t smoke anywhere near your baby, even if you are outside.

SIDS no-COSLEEPING-AND-SIDS-facebook

  • Do not let your baby get too hot. Keep the room where your baby sleeps at a comfortable temperature. In general, dress your baby in no more than one extra layer than you would wear. Your baby may be too hot if she is sweating or if her chest feels hot.
  • Offer a pacifier at nap time and bedtime. This helps to reduce the risk of SIDS. If you are breastfeeding, wait until breastfeeding is going well before offering a pacifier. This usually takes 3 to 4 weeks.

sids back to sleep

  • Do not use home cardiorespiratory monitors to help reduce the risk of SIDS. Home cardiorespiratory monitors can be helpful for babies with breathing or heart problems but they have not been found to reduce the risk of SIDS.
  • Do not use products that claim to reduce the risk of SIDS. Products such as wedges, positioners, special mattresses, and specialized sleep surfaces have not been shown to reduce the risk of SIDS. In addition, some infants have suffocated while using these products.

sids back to play

  • Give your baby plenty of “tummy time” when she is awake and you are present. This will help strengthen neck muscles and avoid flat spots on the head. Always stay with your baby during tummy time and make sure she is awake.

SIDS pregnant-woman-breaking-cigarette

  • If you’re an expectant mom, go to all prenatal doctor visits. Do not smoke, drink alcohol, or use drugs while pregnant and after birth.

Keep these tips handy. We certainly don’t want your sudden bundle of joy to become a victim of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Health Prevention, Pediatrics/Kids Health, Surgical Care

Flu Vaccine Recommendations for 2017-18 and a Quick Influenza Primer

The American Academy of Pediatrics has released its recommendations for the upcoming flu season. There is no equivocation in these recommendations, and we strongly support your complete adherence to them.

Recommendations:

  • Pediatricians offer influenza vaccine to all children 6 months of age and older, as soon as the vaccine becomes available, in order to complete vaccination and provide protection before the flu season starts. Preferably, this should be accomplished by the end of October for best benefit.
  • All household members should be vaccinated, including child care providers, grandparents and women who are pregnant, are postpartum or are breastfeeding during the flu season.
  • The live attenuated intranasal vaccine is NOT recommended, as it has performed poorly in recent years.
  • Special effort should be made to vaccinate all children 6 months and older who have conditions that increase their risk of complications of flu. This includes those born preterm (premmies) and with chronic medical conditions, including the following:
    • asthma and other chronic lung diseases
    • heart disease
    • diabetes and other metabolic problems
    • weakened immune systems.
  • All health care and child care personnel should receive an annual flu shot.

Why:

  • Last year over 100 US children died of the flu, and thousands more were hospitalized from influenza or its complications.
  • Historically, more than 80% of flu deaths in children have been in those not vaccinated.

Etc:

  • Antiviral medications are not a substitute for the vaccine and offer best results only if started within 48 hours of symptoms. If you present after 48 hours of symptom onset, you likely will not receive the medicine.
  • Be clear: the benefits of influenza vaccines greatly outpace the occurrence of any risks, especially in the calculus of death from the disease compared with deaths from the vaccine.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under General Health and Wellness, Health Prevention, Infectious Disease, Pediatrics/Kids Health, Public Health

Straight, No Chaser: Your Guide to Fighting Childhood Obesity (Works for Adults, Too!)

Would you start your child on a fad diet? Of course not. Combating obesity means consistently applying principles that bear fruit (and include fruits over time). So you have an overweight child and want to do better to protect his or her health. Today on Straight, No Chaser, we  discuss tips to promote better habits and health. You may want to keep this list. Of course it starts with you. Be careful! You may discover these tips work for you as well.

Things for the parents to do

parents-kids-obesity

  • Understand that this process involves many individuals (e.g., you, your physicians, dieticians, psychologists – even your personal healthcare consultants). None of you should be expected to do this alone. Ask for help.
  • Appreciate that you are the message. Your words are not enough. You are your children’s role model. They will aspire to look and be like you. Protect your own health.
  • Don’t isolate your child. Get the entire family involved in developing healthy eating and physical activity habits.
  • Don’t mentally punish your child. If they are led to believe they did something wrong or disappointed you, they could adopt dangerous behavior to compensate or punish themselves. Be supportive and positive.

Healthier eating habits

kids-healthy-eating

General conditions

  • Make healthy choices easy and unhealthy ones more difficult. Put nutritious foods where they are easy to see, and keep high-calorie foods out of sight. It takes multiple servings for anyone’s tastes to get used to new foods. Stick with it!
  • Figure out how to avoid fast food. When you do go, choose the healthier options, such as salads with low-fat dressing.
  • Plan special healthy meals and eat together as a family. Make it an adventure, and make it fun and rewarding.
  • Don’t use unhealthy foods as a reward when encouraging kids to eat. Promising dessert to a child for eating vegetables, for example, sends the message that vegetables are less valuable than dessert.
  • Don’t make your child clean his or her plate. This promotes overeating.
  • Learn to limit eating to specific meal and snack times. At other times, the kitchen is “closed.”
  • Avoid large portions. Start with small servings, and let your child ask for more if he or she is still hungry.

Limit the bad

  • Avoid any fats that are solid at room temperature (e.g., butter and lard)
  • Avoid foods that are high in calories, sugar and salt (e.g., sugary drinks, candy, chips, cookies and French fries)
  • Avoid refined grains (white flour, rice and pasta)

Add the good

  • Introduce fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds and whole grains (e.g., brown rice). Don’t worry. They’ll eat them if that’s the option you’re providing.
  • Use fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products or substitutes (e.g., soy beverages)
  • Offer your child water or low-fat milk instead of fruit juice
  • Serve lean meats, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, soy products and eggs

Control the snacking

  • Go with air-popped popcorn without butter
  • Gradually train your kids to like fresh, frozen, dried, or canned fruit served plain or with low-fat yogurt
  • Gradually train your kids to like fresh vegetables like baby carrots, cucumber, zucchini or tomatoes
  • Snack on low-sugar, whole-grain cereal with low-fat or fat-free milk or a milk substitute fortified with calcium and vitamin D

Stay physically active

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Kids need about 60 minutes of physical activity a day. Several short 5-10 minute periods of activity throughout the day are as effective as one 60-minute session. If you are starting from scratch, start from where you are and build up to the 60 minutes target. It only works if you stay diligent.

General considerations:

  • Be the message! Show your child that physical activity is fun, and demonstrate how you enjoy it. Have family activities that include being physically active, such as a walk.
  • Encourage participation in organized sports or classes, such as basketball, dance or soccer.
  • If sports don’t work, other fun activities include dancing to music, playing tag, jumping rope or riding a bike.
  • Assign active chores such as making the beds, sweeping/raking or vacuuming.

Activities that kids choose to do on their own are often best. Try these – and play with your kids. You need to be active, too!

  • Catching and throwing
  • Climbing on a jungle gym or climbing wall
  • Dancing
  • Jumping rope
  • Playing hopscotch
  • Riding a bike
  • Shooting baskets

Cut back on inactive time spent watching TV or on the computer or hand-held device.

  • Limit screen time to no more than two hours per day.
  • Substitute these relatively inactive activities with stimulating ones such as acting out books or stories or doing a family art project.
  • When watching TV, get up and move during TV commercials. By all means, discourage “couch-potato” activity of snacking when sitting in front of the TV.

I know this is a lot, but your kids are worth it, as are you. These actions are habits, not just actions. Work over time to incorporate as many as possible into your family’s routine, and I promise you’ll see the difference.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Diet and Nutrition, Health Prevention, Medical Treatment, Pediatrics/Kids Health

Straight, No Chaser: Childhood Obesity

Childhood-Obesity_Banner-Large-540x1853

Here’s the thing. Adults have control over and choices about how to live their lives. In the overwhelming majority of cases, children do not. Yet, in the overwhelming majority of cases, adults have control over their children’s health.

childhood-obesity-holistic-retreat

Amazingly, approximately one of every three children between the ages of five to 11 is either overweight or obese. It’s not too late. If you’re looking across the breakfast table at a child that’s overweight or obese, please take the time to learn about childhood obesity, the consequences of allowing it to continue and the proactive steps you can take to ward off those consequences. Read on.

If by chance you’re thinking that you have no idea if your child is obese or just looks that way because everyone else in the family looks that way (is “genetically predisposed”), perhaps the first step is to get a better understanding of normal vs. abnormal.

ChildObesity

No matter you perceptions of how “good” or “healthy” it may look, normal is less a function of appearance than a reflection of your heart and other organs’ abilities to perform their tasks. Using the heart as an example (and admittedly being overly simplistic), it is a muscular pump serving the purpose of moving blood around the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the cells of your various organs. The more weight it has to pump against, the harder the task becomes, and the heart will eventually increase the pressure to compensate (i.e., develop high blood pressure). The sooner this process starts, the more at-risk you are for the consequences of the development of high blood pressure and other conditions (including cancer) down the road. Beside high blood pressure, other health issues associated with childhood obesity include the following:

  • Breathing problems
  • Joint problems
  • Diabetes
  • High cholesterol

It is important to acknowledge that “big” is not always unhealthy. The amount of body fat changes with age and based on where children are in their growth curve. A physician will take these things into consideration when you have your child evaluated for clinical obesity. On the other hand, please understand the social pressures children may face at school from being overweight. If they perceive a problem to exist, one does.

In the next Straight, No Chaser, we will discuss in detail what you can do to help children who are obese. To no one’s surprise, a heavy dose of healthy eating and physical activity will be on the prescription. As a prelude to that conversation, I will suggest that you should not be placing a child on a diet without a physician’s order. Healthy eating habits will be the way to go.

childhood-obesity-epidemic-jumpoff

Overall, just remember that either the positive or negative habits children learn are likely to last a lifetime. As a parent, you will be best positioned to guide children along the appropriate path.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Cardiology/Heart, Diet and Nutrition, General Health and Wellness, Pediatrics/Kids Health

Straight, No Chaser In the News: Enacting Laws to Enforce Childhood Immunization

vaxwsj

In the news is vaccination. Again. A decision by the State of California now bars parents from citing religious and other “personal-belief exemptions” for opting out of childhood immunizations. Although the decision was a response to recent outbreaks of measles and other preventable diseases gaining foothold due to reduced immunization rates throughout the state, the implications reach beyond these considerations. (You may recall an outbreak of measles starting at Disneyland in December 2014 that affected 150 people.)

Of course, at the center of the debate is the notion by some that immunizations are dangerous and may be a frequent cause of autism (condolences to those families that actually have suffered). At this time, the medical science remains unequivocal that this is not the case. However, in this day and age when many people are driven by fear and opinions at least as much as by facts and science, the science is being drowned out by the high-profile platforms of celebrities and Internet anecdotes.

vaxchildhood

A second (and rather fascinating) component to the debate is the result of seeking the balance between parental rights and presumed liberty to raise their children as they see fit versus our shared obligations as a society. This concern represents an interesting intersection between public health, individual rights and law.

To that end, the following comments aren’t statements of health care law as much as constructs of public health policy.

  • Despite what you think and what opinions you may have, the greater good (as a public health consideration) has long deemed it necessary to guard against your ability to impose your beliefs in a way that produces harm to your children. Child protection laws have followed this premise.
  • Despite what you desire, your obligation toward contributing to a safer society is greater than your rights to have personal beliefs that specifically endanger the rest of society. In this example, it remains important for citizens to understand the concept of herd immunity. As it applies here, the consideration speaks to broad societal protection from diseases as long as a critical mass of community members opt into getting immunized. This entire debate has become necessary because more than an medically tolerable number of people have decided to benefit from the efforts of others instead of contributing to the protective pool formed by mass immunization.

Medical exceptions in California will now be restricted to children with physician-certified allergies and deficiencies of the immune system. Additionally, parents who participate in various forms of home schooling may be granted waivers.

vaccine_exemption_map.final.0

Obviously, there’s more to follow. California is only the third state to take this step, and there are twenty states still allowing personal belief exemptions. Also, the enforcement process itself will be a source of angst. I’m sure many pediatricians will have trepidation about providing immunizations against parents’ will under the watchful eye of some form of law enforcement. Of course there will be lawsuits that will ultimately answer the questions.

In the meantime, just think about this. Your physicians have every incentive to protect your children and no incentive to harm them. If there actually was a risk from immunizations, don’t you think your doctors would be the ones most loudly sounding the horn? Don’t you think the absence of virtually any physicians doing so tells you what you need to know?

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under General Health and Wellness, Infectious Disease, Pediatrics/Kids Health, Public Health

Straight, No Chaser: Rashes on Your Palms and Soles; It’s Not Always Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

 

In the world of rashes, there aren’t an abundance of rashes that appear on the palms and soles.  However, there are a few of note, so here’s some Quick Tips to point you in the right direction. This doesn’t take long for you to learn, so commit this to memory, and you could save yourself a lot of drama down the road. Don’t forget to wear gloves and wash your hands!

There’s actually an entity called hand, foot and mouth disease, commonly seen in children and caused by the Coxsackie A virus.  It’s rather benign.

Hand-Foot-and-Mouth-Disease-3hand-foot-mouth-disease1hand-foot-mouth

If you’ve spent any time in the woods of the Southeastern U.S. (usually between April and September), you may recall being bitten by a tick (which will transmit an infection from a bacteria named Rickettsia Rickettsii).  If you contract Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (yes, it’s misnamed – the Rocky Mountains aren’t in the Southeastern U.S.), your rash may look like this.

RMSFRMSFfeet

If you’re a child with five or more days of fever, pink eye, dryness in the mouth, big lymph nodes in the neck and this rash, your physician should consider Kawasaki’s disease.  This is caused by an inflammation of blood vessels, and demographically, it is seen more often in those of Asian descent.

kawasaki

Sometimes in Kawasaki’s disease, the tongue may look like a strawberry.

Kawasaki2

And yes, secondary syphilis presents with rashes on the palms and soles.  The real take home message is this.  Primary syphilis is so overlooked (because the initial genital lesion is painless and may come and go without much announcement), the development of rashes on the hands and feet may be the first time you get diagnosed.  Trust me, you want to get treated before tertiary syphilis develops.  Here’s what that rash looks like.

2ndsyphilis2ndarysyphilis

The long and short of it, is if you or a loved one develop a rash on the palms and/or soles, get it evaluated.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Pediatrics/Kids Health, Skin/Dermatology

Straight, No Chaser: Kids Summer Fun Gone Wrong – Trampoline & Hover Board Trauma

With this long holiday weekend upon us, let me share a story…. It starts with me back in the emergency room with a little girl who looks like her forearm is going to fall off the rest of her upper extremity.

People love trampolines and more recently, hover boards. Yet somehow the only time I seem to hear the word trampoline is when someone’s been hurt. I’m not the only one who’d vaporize them on site. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that trampolines never be used at home or in outdoor playgrounds, because associated injuries include head and neck contusions, fractures, strains and sprains, among other injuries.

posterior1

So my patient had a (posteriorly) dislocated elbow, meaning she fell off the trampoline, landing on the back of the extended upper arm, pushing the upper arm bone (the humerus) in front of the elbow and forearm. This is how that looks (yes, the ball is supposed to fit into the socket). You are similarly at risk from falls from our newfangled hover boards.

hoverboard-legs

So for the joy of bouncing on a trampoline, the child had to be put asleep so the elbow could be replaced into the appropriate position. This procedure is fraught with potential for complications, including a broken bone on the way back, as well as damage to the local nerves and arteries (brachial artery, median and ulnar nerves), which can become entrapped during the effort to relocate the bone into the elbow joint. Some limitation in fully bending the arm up and down (flexion and extension) is common after a dislocation, especially without prompt orthopedic and physical therapy follow-up. This really is a high price to pay for the privilege of bouncing up and down.

So if you’re going to allow your kids to play on a trampoline, here are three tips shown to reduce injuries:

  • Find one of those nets that encloses the trampoline to prevent a child from being thrown from the trampoline.
  • Make sure the frame and hooks are completely covered with padding to prevent a child from getting impaled or scratched.
  • Keep the trampoline away from anything else, including trees and rocks. This works even better if the trampoline is enclosed as previously mentioned.

trampolinesThink back to the little girl I had to care for and consider whether this predictable event (complete with the mental stress of being in a loud emergency room in pain, getting an IV needle and being put to sleep) was worth the effort. As per routine, an ounce of prevention…

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Pediatrics/Kids Health, Trauma