Category Archives: Diet and Nutrition

Straight, No Chaser: Artificial Sweeteners

artificial sweeteners do you

It’s always struck me as somewhat odd when people approach me with concerns about sugar substitutes. What I mean by that is my first response is something akin to “Whatever your concerns are, the sugar substitute is going to be safer than using the sugar you’ve been using.” This Straight, No Chaser answers some basic questions about the use of the various artificial sweeteners. The considerations discussed below assume use of artificial sweeteners in a roughly equivalent manner as table sugar (i.e. in the same amounts).

Artificial-Sweeteners

When would I want to use an artificial sweetener?

Let’s start with the premise that you would do well to find an alternative to your routine table sugar (sucralose). Just because you’re used to it doesn’t mean it’s safe. The increased calories and subsequence risks for obesity, diabetes and other medical conditions are well and extensively described. Artificial sweeteners are attractive alternatives to sugar because they add essentially no calories to your diet. Also, if you’ve used artificial sweeteners at all, you likely know you need only a fraction of the amount of sugar you would normally use for sweetness.

 artificial sweetener 1

What are the health benefits?

There are three potentially big benefits to using artificial sweeteners.

  • Dental: Artificial sweeteners don’t contribute to dental decay and cavities.
  • Weight control: Artificial sweeteners have virtually no calories. In contrast, each gram of regular table sugar contains 4 calories, and a teaspoon of sugar contains about 16 calories. In practical terms, one 12-ounce can of a sweetened cola contains 8 teaspoons of added sugar, or about 130 calories. If you’re trying to lose weight or trying to prevent weight gain, using artificial sweeteners instead of higher calorie table sugar may be an attractive option.
  • Diabetes control: Unlike sugar, artificial sweeteners generally don’t raise blood sugar levels (because they are not carbohydrates). Always check with your doctor or dietitian about using any sugar substitutes if you have diabetes. You’ll likely be advised that artificial sweeteners may be a good alternative to sugar if you have diabetes.

What about the possible health concerns with artificial sweeteners?

artificial-sweetener safety

Many people remember that once upon a time (i.e. in the 1970s), saccharin was linked to bladder cancer in lab rats. Some have been skeptical, if not fearful, of artificial sweeteners ever since. The fact of the matter is, according to the National Cancer Institute and other health agencies, there’s no compelling scientific evidence that any of the artificial sweeteners approved for use in the U.S. cause cancer or other serious health problems. Saccharin doesn’t even carry a warning label anymore. Furthermore, numerous research studies confirm that artificial sweeteners are generally safe in limited quantities, even for pregnant women. You should be comforted by the fact that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates artificial sweeteners. They all have been extensively reviewed and approved prior to public release. Furthermore, the stated “acceptable daily intake (ADI)” for artificial sweeteners (i.e. the maximum amount considered safe to consume each day over the course of your lifetime) is intended to be about 100 times less than the smallest amount that might cause health concerns.

Artificial-Sweetners-21

Bottom line: Moderation is key because artificial sweeteners are attached to foods. Just because a food is marketed as sugar-free (having artificial sweeteners) doesn’t mean it’s free of calories; there are other ingredients in foods that likely contain calories. A common and realistic fear of artificial sweetener use is folks tend to consume more than they previously may have. This can lead to weight gain! Another consideration is if you’re getting your artificial sweeteners in processed foods, these generally don’t offer the same health benefits as whole foods such as fruits and vegetables.

There are a million articles from less renown sources that speak to ominous effects of sugar substitutes. Remember that virtually every substance known to man has adverse effects if used excessively. Based on the current medical literature, both on a relative and absolute scale, you should feel no concern with replacing your table sugar with sugar substitutes.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Straight, No Chaser: Treating Your Gas and Gas Pains

So… you have problems with gas. What are you to do? Well, given that gas production is a natural occurrence, it’s not like you’re going to eliminate having gas (no pun intended). If you read the previous post on what produces belching and flatus, you should have a good idea as to why different things affect you the way they do. Understanding this directly leads into how you can prevent, reduce and treat untoward gas production.

gas-bloating

I’ll make this simple. If you want to reduce the amount of gas you produce, think of these three considerations within your reach. If these efforts prove ineffective, your physician may prescribe medicine, but this should not be the initial consideration.

Adjust your diet

  • If you recall the variety of foods that produce gas or simply remember foods high in carbohydrates produce more gas than foods high in fat or protein, that’s a start. Unfortunately this requires thought and balance. Many healthy foods produce gas (e.g. fruits, vegetables and whole grains). You don’t want to create an unhealthy diet in pursuit of convenience. Be reminded that while fat does not cause gas to the extent that carbohydrates do, limiting high-fat foods can still help reduce bloating and discomfort. Less fat in the diet helps the stomach empty faster. This allows gases to move more quickly through the digestive system.
  • If you believe or know yourself to be lactose intolerant, simple avoidance of dairy products will improve your situation.

chewing gum

Change how you eat

  • Your eating habits play a role in this. For example, if you are a fast eater, you’re likely gulping down air. Slow it down, and chew more thoroughly.
  • Think about how you chew. Do you keep your mouth open? If so, that involves swallowing more air. Now think about those people who habitually chew gum or hard candies with their mouths open. These are habits easily altered.
  • Keep your dentures or dental plates adjusted so they fit. The constant production of air pockets in those loose spaces can get transmitted down your digestive track as you chew. A little attention in this direction can lead to a lot less gas. Check with your dentist.

gas-x

Over-the-counter (OTC) treatments

You know certain OTC medicines well. It’s reasonable for you to know what they’re doing.

  • Beano (alpha-galactosidase) is a digestive aid. It helps the body digest the sugar contained within beans and many vegetables. It doesn’t affect gas production from lactose or fiber.
  • Mylanta, Maalox or Gas-X (simethicone) also can relieve bloating and abdominal pain or discomfort caused by gas. These products don’t affect gas production but do increase the rate of gas elimination. Thus, even when it seems as if one of these is not producing immediate relief, it’s likely helping.
  • Lactase tablets or drops can help people with lactose intolerance digest milk and milk products to reduce gas production. Lactose intolerance is discussed in detail in another Straight, No Chaser post.

Here’s a final word of caution. Gas pain may not be due to simple considerations. Those who burp frequently can have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Cardiac disease can present with gas pain. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be a reason why you’re more sensitive to gas pain. There are many other examples.

Remember: if these tips aren’t effective in improving your gas discomfort, please consider getting evaluated.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Diet and Nutrition, Gastrointestinal

Straight, No Chaser: Malnutrition

Do you know someone so poor that eating is a constant concern? Do you have a child who is a finicky eater? Have you ever been concerned that your child might become malnourished? Whether or not your thoughts have reached the level of concern, you should be aware of the notion. After all, malnutrition is directly responsible for 300,000 deaths per year in children younger than 5 years old, especially in developing countries. It is the number one cause of child deaths across the world, contributing directly or indirectly to over half of all deaths in children. According to the UN World Food Programme, 925 million people in the world do not have enough to eat.

What is malnutrition?

malnutrition Kwashiorkor

Malnutrition is a state of being in which the body fails to receive adequate nutrition, and this state prevents proper health and development.

Causes of Malnutrition

All over the world, the poor are at the greatest risk malnutrition. Wars and natural disasters such as droughts, tsunamis, hurricanes and earthquakes can have disruptive effects on food production and distribution, contributing to hunger and subsequent malnutrition.

Also those who can’t respond to the body’s hunger signals (e.g. due to injury or loss of extremity use while living without adequate support; aging or other illness may reduce appetite) are at risk for malnutrition. However, someone can become malnourished for reasons that have nothing to do with hunger. You can still be malnourished even relatively having plenty to eat if the foods consumed don’t provide the right nutrients, vitamins, and minerals.

malnutrition diarrhea

Another consideration in malnutrition is the presence of a disease or conditions that prevents you from digesting or absorbing your food properly. For example:

  • Someone with celiac disease has intestinal problems that are triggered by a gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley.
  • Those with cystic fibrosis have trouble absorbing nutrients because the disease affects the pancreas and its ability to produce enzymes necessary for digestion.

malnutrition worldwide

Malnutrition can be limited to a specific nutritional deficiency. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that as many 2 billion people worldwide have insufficient dietary intake of nutrients like iron, vitamin A, and zinc.

  • Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world. You may be aware that this deficiency causes anemia and can retard development in kids.
  • Vitamin A deficiency from malnutrition is the chief cause of preventable blindness in the developing world; it also increases the risk of dying from infections, from measles, or diarrhea.

What are the symptoms of malnutrition?

Malnutrition symptoms

Malnutrition negatively impacts both the body and the mind; as such, a variety of symptoms are produced.

  • Hunger is a sign that your body needs food. You need food to assist your various organs in performing adequately.
  • If you’re malnourished, your immunity is reduced. This means you more likely to become sick from a variety of causes.
  • Malnourished individuals are likely to be significantly underweight.
  • Malnourished children’s growth may be stunted, making them much shorter than average.

Other symptoms include the following:

  • Abnormal bodily organ function
  • Decaying teeth
  • Dizziness
  • Dry, scaly skin
  • Fatigue and low energy
  • Learning difficulty
  • Muscle weakness
  • Osteoporosis (fragile bones that break easily)
  • Poor attention span
  • Stomach bloating
  • Swollen and bleeding gums
  • Slowed reaction times

Those pregnant and malnourished, may have offspring that weigh less at birth and have a lower chance of survival.

Addressing hunger and malnutrition

malnutrition impact

There are two considerations here: limiting your risk and treating hunger and malnutrition.

  • In the U.S., foods are typically fortified with vitamins and minerals to prevent certain nutritional deficiencies. For example, adding iodine to salt helps prevent some thyroid gland problems (such as goiter), folic acid added to foods helps prevent certain birth defects, and supplemental iron can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia.
  • Alcohol can interfere with nutrient absorption such that even if vitamins and minerals are consumed, alcoholics can still develop deficiencies. It’s more likely that alcoholics aren’t engaging in healthy eating habits.
  • Vegetarians, vegans and others on special diets should be mindful to eat balanced meals and a variety of foods to get the right nutrients.

Treating Malnourished Children

malNUTRITION-image

Fortunately, many of the harmful effects of malnutrition can be reversed, especially if a child is only mildly or briefly malnourished. You don’t need a pill. Learn to engage in healthy eating habits, which can be done at any budget. The best way to ensure that kids are properly nourished is to serve a variety of healthy foods. Try to limit unhealthy snacks and those empty calories that make them feel full prior to getting adequate nutrition with their meal. If you’re concerned that your child’s energy level is lagging or that he or she isn’t growing normally, ask your physician for an evaluation.

If you think your child isn’t getting enough of the right nutrients, talk to your doctor. Fortunately, many effects of malnutrition can be reversed if it’s early in the process. Unfortunately, too often malnourished children aren’t discovered until the effects of malnutrition have permitted other illnesses to take hold.

malnutrition help

As a final thought, please consider supporting one of the entities dedicated to combating hunger. To support Feeding America, visit their site at http://feedingamerica.org. Around the world, you can support organizations such as Hunger Relief International; visit their site at www.hungerreliefinternational.org.

Feeding_America_logo

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Diet and Nutrition, General Health and Wellness, Health Prevention

Straight, No Chaser: Your Guide to Fighting Childhood Obesity (Works for Adults, Too!)

Would you start your child on a fad diet? Of course not. Combating obesity means consistently applying principles that bear fruit (and include fruits over time). So you have an overweight child and want to do better to protect his or her health. Today on Straight, No Chaser, we  discuss tips to promote better habits and health. You may want to keep this list. Of course it starts with you. Be careful! You may discover these tips work for you as well.

Things for the parents to do

parents-kids-obesity

  • Understand that this process involves many individuals (e.g., you, your physicians, dieticians, psychologists – even your personal healthcare consultants). None of you should be expected to do this alone. Ask for help.
  • Appreciate that you are the message. Your words are not enough. You are your children’s role model. They will aspire to look and be like you. Protect your own health.
  • Don’t isolate your child. Get the entire family involved in developing healthy eating and physical activity habits.
  • Don’t mentally punish your child. If they are led to believe they did something wrong or disappointed you, they could adopt dangerous behavior to compensate or punish themselves. Be supportive and positive.

Healthier eating habits

kids-healthy-eating

General conditions

  • Make healthy choices easy and unhealthy ones more difficult. Put nutritious foods where they are easy to see, and keep high-calorie foods out of sight. It takes multiple servings for anyone’s tastes to get used to new foods. Stick with it!
  • Figure out how to avoid fast food. When you do go, choose the healthier options, such as salads with low-fat dressing.
  • Plan special healthy meals and eat together as a family. Make it an adventure, and make it fun and rewarding.
  • Don’t use unhealthy foods as a reward when encouraging kids to eat. Promising dessert to a child for eating vegetables, for example, sends the message that vegetables are less valuable than dessert.
  • Don’t make your child clean his or her plate. This promotes overeating.
  • Learn to limit eating to specific meal and snack times. At other times, the kitchen is “closed.”
  • Avoid large portions. Start with small servings, and let your child ask for more if he or she is still hungry.

Limit the bad

  • Avoid any fats that are solid at room temperature (e.g., butter and lard)
  • Avoid foods that are high in calories, sugar and salt (e.g., sugary drinks, candy, chips, cookies and French fries)
  • Avoid refined grains (white flour, rice and pasta)

Add the good

  • Introduce fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds and whole grains (e.g., brown rice). Don’t worry. They’ll eat them if that’s the option you’re providing.
  • Use fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products or substitutes (e.g., soy beverages)
  • Offer your child water or low-fat milk instead of fruit juice
  • Serve lean meats, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, soy products and eggs

Control the snacking

  • Go with air-popped popcorn without butter
  • Gradually train your kids to like fresh, frozen, dried, or canned fruit served plain or with low-fat yogurt
  • Gradually train your kids to like fresh vegetables like baby carrots, cucumber, zucchini or tomatoes
  • Snack on low-sugar, whole-grain cereal with low-fat or fat-free milk or a milk substitute fortified with calcium and vitamin D

Stay physically active

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Kids need about 60 minutes of physical activity a day. Several short 5-10 minute periods of activity throughout the day are as effective as one 60-minute session. If you are starting from scratch, start from where you are and build up to the 60 minutes target. It only works if you stay diligent.

General considerations:

  • Be the message! Show your child that physical activity is fun, and demonstrate how you enjoy it. Have family activities that include being physically active, such as a walk.
  • Encourage participation in organized sports or classes, such as basketball, dance or soccer.
  • If sports don’t work, other fun activities include dancing to music, playing tag, jumping rope or riding a bike.
  • Assign active chores such as making the beds, sweeping/raking or vacuuming.

Activities that kids choose to do on their own are often best. Try these – and play with your kids. You need to be active, too!

  • Catching and throwing
  • Climbing on a jungle gym or climbing wall
  • Dancing
  • Jumping rope
  • Playing hopscotch
  • Riding a bike
  • Shooting baskets

Cut back on inactive time spent watching TV or on the computer or hand-held device.

  • Limit screen time to no more than two hours per day.
  • Substitute these relatively inactive activities with stimulating ones such as acting out books or stories or doing a family art project.
  • When watching TV, get up and move during TV commercials. By all means, discourage “couch-potato” activity of snacking when sitting in front of the TV.

I know this is a lot, but your kids are worth it, as are you. These actions are habits, not just actions. Work over time to incorporate as many as possible into your family’s routine, and I promise you’ll see the difference.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Diet and Nutrition, Health Prevention, Medical Treatment, Pediatrics/Kids Health

Straight, No Chaser: Childhood Obesity

Childhood-Obesity_Banner-Large-540x1853

Here’s the thing. Adults have control over and choices about how to live their lives. In the overwhelming majority of cases, children do not. Yet, in the overwhelming majority of cases, adults have control over their children’s health.

childhood-obesity-holistic-retreat

Amazingly, approximately one of every three children between the ages of five to 11 is either overweight or obese. It’s not too late. If you’re looking across the breakfast table at a child that’s overweight or obese, please take the time to learn about childhood obesity, the consequences of allowing it to continue and the proactive steps you can take to ward off those consequences. Read on.

If by chance you’re thinking that you have no idea if your child is obese or just looks that way because everyone else in the family looks that way (is “genetically predisposed”), perhaps the first step is to get a better understanding of normal vs. abnormal.

ChildObesity

No matter you perceptions of how “good” or “healthy” it may look, normal is less a function of appearance than a reflection of your heart and other organs’ abilities to perform their tasks. Using the heart as an example (and admittedly being overly simplistic), it is a muscular pump serving the purpose of moving blood around the body, delivering oxygen and nutrients to the cells of your various organs. The more weight it has to pump against, the harder the task becomes, and the heart will eventually increase the pressure to compensate (i.e., develop high blood pressure). The sooner this process starts, the more at-risk you are for the consequences of the development of high blood pressure and other conditions (including cancer) down the road. Beside high blood pressure, other health issues associated with childhood obesity include the following:

  • Breathing problems
  • Joint problems
  • Diabetes
  • High cholesterol

It is important to acknowledge that “big” is not always unhealthy. The amount of body fat changes with age and based on where children are in their growth curve. A physician will take these things into consideration when you have your child evaluated for clinical obesity. On the other hand, please understand the social pressures children may face at school from being overweight. If they perceive a problem to exist, one does.

In the next Straight, No Chaser, we will discuss in detail what you can do to help children who are obese. To no one’s surprise, a heavy dose of healthy eating and physical activity will be on the prescription. As a prelude to that conversation, I will suggest that you should not be placing a child on a diet without a physician’s order. Healthy eating habits will be the way to go.

childhood-obesity-epidemic-jumpoff

Overall, just remember that either the positive or negative habits children learn are likely to last a lifetime. As a parent, you will be best positioned to guide children along the appropriate path.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Cardiology/Heart, Diet and Nutrition, General Health and Wellness, Pediatrics/Kids Health

Straight, No Chaser: Beeting Back High Blood Pressure and Poor Blood Flow to the Brain

beetroot

Writing this makes me feel like your mother telling you to eat your spinach, but that’s another conversation. We’ve been talking a lot lately about brain health, and we’re always into improving your baseline health through actions such as lowering your blood pressure. Today’s Straight, No Chaser offers you a challenge that doesn’t involve dumping ice on your head.

In my mind, I’ve reduced much of life to having good blood flow, allowing for delivery of oxygen and other nutrients to essential parts of your body. Much of our performance in various ways is related to just that. To that end, if you’d like to include your blood flow to your brain, consider adding a bit of beet juice into your life.

beetlejuice

No, not Beetlejuice…

beet-juice-5-1-of-1

Yes, that’s better.

Beet juice contains substances known as nitrates, which when metabolized within the body (into nitrites) relax blood vessels and promote better blood flow. Better blood flow equals better oxygenation and delivery of nutrition throughout your body, notably your brain. This blood flow activity isn’t just theoretical. Brain scans and MRIs taken shortly after and even a day after ingesting 8 ounces of beet root juice decisively demonstrate better blood flow and brain activity. This stuff works, and it’s natural!

The good news isn’t just limited to your brain. Beet juice has long been known as a powerful detoxifier, which your liver appreciates. It is a great source of antioxidants, which helps your entire body. Also, appreciate that beet juice has been shown to lower your blood pressure. Recall that blood pressure is a measure of the force the heart needs to pump blood throughout your body. We’re better off with a lower pressure, which is a sign of a more efficiently performing heart. Beet juice is a simple way to reduce your blood pressure by about 10 points.

Here are a final few fun facts for your consideration:

  • Beet juice is even better than eating cooked beets.
  • One to two cups a day is sufficient to get the desired health benefits.
  • Be advised that drinking beet juice may change your urine and bowel movements to a reddish color. This does not represent a danger.

beat-it-michael-jackson

Here’s to your health. Now beet it!

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Comments Off on Straight, No Chaser: Beeting Back High Blood Pressure and Poor Blood Flow to the Brain

Filed under Cardiology/Heart, Detoxification, Diet and Nutrition, General Health and Wellness

Straight, No Chaser In The News: Omega-3 Supplements Do Not Protect Against Dementia

omega-3

Today’s Straight, No Chaser continues our ongoing conversation about your health not being found in a (supplement) bottle. In the news is new research reaffirming that taking omega-3 supplements do not appear to protect the brain from dementia and other forms of cognitive decline. Meanwhile, data continues to mount challenging the previously held views that omega-3 supplements protect the heart in ways previous thought, and that these supplements do not prevent macular degeneration of the eyes. These most recent findings related to cognitive decline come from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where researchers followed 4,000 at risk individuals over a five-year period.

Omega-3-Essential-Fatty-Acids-for-Eyesight1

Omega-3s are the fatty acids found most abundantly in fish. The original notion that these fatty acids were particularly good for you came from studies noting the superior health status of hunter-gatherer societies that heavily relied on diets including fish. The importance and urgency of these findings are found in the fact that Alzheimer’s disease remains the most common cause of dementia. In the U.S. alone, it affects over 5.1 million Americans age 65 and older. With demographics being what they are, the number of those affected is expected to triple in the next 40 years.

omega3s

It is important to note that these findings speak to supplements, not to intake of foods naturally rich in omega-3s, such as fish and flax seeds. Continue to enjoy the benefits of healthy eating and exercise, which in the example of regularly consuming fish, absolutely includes lower rates of cardiovascular (heart) disease, macular degeneration of the eye and possibly dementia.

omega-3-6-575x262

There are two additional salient points to be made, based on these new studies.

  1. Health is a habit, and you shouldn’t expect to find a cure for what ills you in supplements. The value of what occurs naturally again and again has been shown less able to be transferred into supplements.
  2. Health is a result, and it’s best secured by establishing a lifetime of healthy habits. Over time, you will either benefit or suffer from the way you live your life. Start those healthy habits as soon as you can for maximal benefit.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

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