Category Archives: Gastrointestinal

Straight, No Chaser: Treatment of Food Poisoning (Foodborne Illness)

food-poisoning home remedies

The vomiting, diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps and all around bad feelings you may get with food poisoning is extremely unpleasant. We’ve previously discussed preventative measures you can take to minimize your risks, but you should also want to know what measures to take in the event you actually develop food poisoning. Of course, with over 250 different illnesses related to various forms of food poisoning, there’s a wide variety of treatment, some of which means to treat the specific disease (and its cause) and others that only treat the symptoms.

I always tell patients that although the vomiting and diarrhea are dramatic nuisance symptoms, the real concern is the risk of dehydration from these fluid losses. Given the body is approximately two-thirds water, altering that balance can lead to disturbances of many of the body’s functions and increase the risk of more serious infections. Thus the key to treatment is staying ahead of fluid and electrolyte losses that occur. Perhaps you’re wondering “How can I do that if I’m vomiting?” Here are five very important principles for you to remember.

  • First things first: if you have severe diarrhea, your favorite sports drink is not the cure. The composition of fluids and electrolytes in your stool is different from in your sweat, so these drinks don’t optimally replace your losses.

ORT

  • I want you to become familiar with oral rehydration therapy/solution (ORT). It’s how most of the rest of the world first treats fluid losses from vomiting and diarrhea. You may have heard of Ceralyte, Oralyte or Pedialyte, all of which are examples. ORT represents the best possible fluid for you to take and is readily available without a prescription at your local pharmacy or grocery store.
  • Here’s the deal with staying hydrated: you can’t hold a lot on your stomach. You need to dial back as much as possible so that you can tolerate something. That’s why you sip on chicken soup instead of steak when you’re sick. You’re likely to have more success keeping down teaspoons of fluid at a more frequent interval (say, every few minutes) than trying to chug a lot of fluid all at once. Food-Poison pink
  • Preparations of bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol is a common example) can reduce the duration and severity of simple diarrhea.
  • If you have diarrhea and cramps with a fever or bloody stools, you should not take antidiarrheal medication without an evaluation by a physician. Even if they make you feel better, these medicines can make your food poisoning much worse.

Here’s one other point that you should understand as you’re going into your doctor’s office or the emergency room: don’t expect to receive an antibiotic to treat your vomiting and diarrhea. Most of these episodes are caused by viruses, which are self-limited and will resolve within two to three days. Furthermore, viruses don’t respond to antibiotics. In fact, efforts to use antibiotics in many of these cases only contribute to antibiotic resistance later on when you actually need them. Antibiotic resistance is discussed in detail in this Straight, No Chaser post.

Innocent problems

Finally, here are symptoms that should prompt you to see your physician.

  • Bloody stools
  • Diarrhea lasting more than 3 days
  • High fever (oral temperature over 101.4 F)
  • Signs of dehydration, such as a decrease in urination, a dry mouth and throat, and dizziness with standing
  • Vomiting with inability to keep down liquids

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Diet and Nutrition, Gastrointestinal, Infectious Disease

Straight, No Chaser: Understanding Food Poisoning (Foodborne Illness)

FoodPoisoning

We make a decision with everything we place into our mouths. We also exhibit a large amount of trust that the food we eat is safe. Most of the time that’s true, but unfortunately sometimes it’s not. Here are some questions and answers to understanding the scope of food poisoning.

How frequent is food poisoning?

According to 2011 data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), every year in the U.S. approximately 1 in 6 Americans (almost 50 million people) gets sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases.

food poisoning

What causes food poisoning?

Over 250 different foodborne diseases have been described, most of which are infections. The most common foodborne illnesses are caused by norovirus and by the bacteria SalmonellaClostridium perfringens, and CampylobacterStaph Aureus (yes, that Staph) is another prominent but less common cause of food poisoning. Poisonous chemicals or other harmful substances can cause foodborne diseases if present in food.

What are the most common symptoms of food poisoning?

Even though there are many different foodborne diseases, they share a commonality of entering your system through your gastrointestinal tract. As a result, the first symptoms are caused and expressed from there and typically include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps.

foodpoisoning traceback_900px

Why do foodborne diseases seem to occur in outbreaks?

Actually, the overwhelming majority of cases of food poisoning don’t occur in outbreaks, but of course you wouldn’t know that because having diarrhea is not something people typically will tell you… When outbreaks occur, it’s because a group of people happened to eat the same contaminated item. This would explain how instances of groups of friends or strangers could have been involved. Contamination that occur closest to the food supply’s distribution result in the widest outbreaks. Look at the above picture. If contaminated food from the producer makes it all the way through the distribution chain, individuals in multiple states could end up with the same infection.

   foodpoisoningfoodsimage

What foods are most associated with foodborne illness?

  • Foods that mingle the products of many individual animals: Raw milk, pooled raw eggs and ground beef have increased risk because contamination in any one of the multiple animals involved can contaminate the entire mixture.
  • Raw foods of animal origin: Foods such as meat, poultry, shellfish, eggs and unpasteurized milk are the most likely foods to be contaminated.
  • Raw fruits and vegetables: Washing reduces but doesn’t eliminate pre-existing contamination, such as that occurring from the fresh manure that fertilizes vegetables. Furthermore, water itself may be contaminated.
  • Shellfish: Because “filter-feeding” shellfish strain microorganisms from the sea over many months, they are particularly likely to be contaminated if there are any in the seawater.

An additional Straight, No Chaser will discuss treatment options. Refer to this post for preventative tips.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Detoxification, Gastrointestinal

Straight, No Chaser: Me on the Business End of a Colonoscopy, aka Getting Screened for Colorectal Cancer

colonoscopy

The last two posts have highlighted recommended screening examinations for men and women between ages 40-64. In today’s Straight, No Chaser, I want to pay special attention to one examination in particular: the screening colonoscopy, largely because I had the experience of getting it done just yesterday – but more on that later in the post.

Colon cancer is the second most common cause of cancer in the United States after lung cancer (stop smoking!). As previously noted in the post on recommended screenings, everyone should have a screening colonoscopy at least by age 50. Certain groups of individuals, such as African-Americans and those with positive family history for colon cancer should have the test done earlier. Simply put, colonoscopy is definitive in screening and diagnosing colorectal cancer, and it is one of the most successful ways to both prevent and treat early cancer.

Here’s a bit about how a colonoscopy is done.

colonoscopy-icons

First, you have to do a bowel prep. Over a few days, you’ll eliminate certain foods (e.g. corn, nuts) from your diet, then progress to an all liquid diet, followed by taking a few doses of a very strong laxative to completely clean out the contents of your intestines (those of you looking for a good detox should be so lucky). I actually lost 3.5 pounds doing this.

colonoscopy_procedure

The exam involves using a tube (colonoscope) to view your digestive tissue from your rectum all the way up the large intestine (approximately 5 feet). It includes cleaning away and suction stool that blocks the view, direct visualization of the intestines and real-time removal of suspicious tissue (e.g. polyps) that could be cancerous or early signs of cancer. You may or may not choose to be sedated (put to sleep) during this. Of course, my medical curiosity was such that I wanted to see everything on the screen in real time, so I went without any medications, and yes, I lived to tell the story: the level of discomfort never got higher than a 3 on a scale of 1-10.

The point here is simple and straightforward: Most people in whom colon cancer is found and treated early will not only be alive 5 years later, but many will live a normal life span. On the other hand, when it’s not, colorectal cancer is very dangerous because it often doesn’t cause noticeable signs or symptoms until the cancer is advanced and much more difficult to treat. The screening colonoscopy gives you the best chance to know where you stand.

colonoscopy-s2-why-is-colonoscopy-done

So this isn’t that complicated. If you’re older, African-American, have a positive family history for colon cancer or inflammatory intestinal conditions, live a sedentary lifestyle or have a low-fiber, high-fat diet, you are at risk. A word about your diet: you should know that according to the American Institute for Cancer Research, just 1.7 ounces of processed meats consumed daily (equivalent to less than two strips of bacon) roughly increase a person’s risk for colorectal cancer by 21 percent. More definitely, no amount of processed meat is considered safe for consumption.

Thankfully, my colonoscopy was perfectly normal: I keep telling you diet is 75% of health (unless you’re either lucky or unlucky in your genetic makeup)! The actual colonoscopy took just over 10 minutes, and I won’t have to go through this for another 10 years. Isn’t that investment of time worth giving yourself the best chance for a clean bill of colon and rectal health?

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Gastrointestinal, General Health and Wellness, Health Prevention, Hematology & Oncology/Blood Disorders/Cancer

Straight, No Chaser: Treatment of Acid Reflux (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)

acid-reflux-400x400

If you experience heartburn two times a week or more, you may have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Because there are significant differences in the severity of GERD, you should know when varying forms of treatment may be necessary. This Straight, No Chaser focuses on treatment of mild symptoms. For discussion of more severe GERD, visit www.sterlingmedicaladvice.com or discuss the options listed below with your healthcare provider.

acid-reflux-step-3-preview

Mild symptoms As is the case for many diseases, simple dietary changes away from foods that increase acid producing and reflux symptoms often can be sufficient. As a reminder, such foods include alcohol, caffeine, chocolate, fatty foods and peppermint. With mild symptoms, over the counter medications such as antacids or antihistamines might be all that’s needed. Additional considerations such as the following have been shown to be helpful in some people with mild reflux and is worth the effort.

  • avoiding large meals
  • avoiding late meals
  • avoiding tight-fitting clothing
  • elevating the head of your bed six to eight inches
  • increasing the chewing of gum or use of oral lozenges (this is related to saliva production, which can neutralize acid)
  • quitting smoking (smoking actually reduces saliva production)
  • weight loss

acid_reflux_treatment

If and when medicines are used for mild symptoms, there are two classes of medicines used.

  • Antacids — Antacids such as Maalox, Myalanta and Tums are commonly used for short-term relief of acid reflux. The frustration you may have experienced in taking them is related to the fact that these medicines only neutralize stomach acid very briefly after each dose.
  • Histamine antagonists (aka antihistamines) — These medicines, including cimetidine (Tagamet), famotidine (Pepcid), nizatidine (Axid) and ranitidine (Zantac), reduce acid production in the stomach and are often helpful as a first line effort.

Moderate to severe symptoms — For patients with moderate, severe or refractory symptoms of acid reflux, or for those with complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease, different treatment options must be used.

  • Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) — This class of prescription medicine is stronger and more effective than the histamine antagonists listed above. When these are necessary, it typically takes an eight-week course of treatment to optimize dosing and produce the best results that can be achieved.
  • Surgical treatment — When PPIs are ineffective, surgical options such as strengthening the lower esophageal sphincter and repairing any hiatus hernias (conditions in which the stomach partially slips through the diaphragm into the chest, facilitating more escape of acid into the esophagus) may be necessary.

There’s a lot you can do to avoid taking medicines and needing surgery. Make those better choices and live a healthier, happier life!

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Gastrointestinal, Medical Treatment

Straight, No Chaser: Acid Reflux (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)

I’m at the point in life where I rarely eat after 8 pm. That has defined health benefits, but it’s also protective from today’s Straight, No Chaser topic: gastroesophageal reflux, aka GERD, aka acid reflux, aka reflux. You should be surprised and feel fortunate if reflux don’t bother you at some point. Let’s tackle this spicy topic via a question and answer format:

acidreflux

What is reflux? Most simply put, acid reflux occurs whenever stomach contents back up into your food pipe (esophagus) and/or mouth.

Why does this occur? Your feeding tube (esophagus) has a connection to the stomach at its lower end. This connection is made via a circular ring of muscle called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The LES relaxes and contracts to allow food to enter and prevent it from forward back up into the esophagus. Unfortunately, there are a number of conditions that cause the sphincter to relax, such as episode overeating, lying flat and the presence of a hiatus hernia (more on that in the next blog).

Is this a disease? Some degree of acid reflux is actually normal, but it does rise to the level of a disease (gastroesophageal reflux disease, aka GERD) when symptoms create difficulties for the patient.

acid-reflux

What are the symptoms? You know them, and you hate them! The most common symptoms include heartburn, difficulty with swallowing (including pain or food getting stuck; this is called dysphagia), regurgitation and vomiting. In fact, heartburn occurs in 10 million adults in the US every day. In severe cases, the acid can cause hoarseness due to the effects on the vocal cords or go back down the air tube (trachea) and into the lungs (this is called aspiration). Here are some additional symptoms you may experience.

  • Asthma “only” at night
  • Chronic cough
  • Chronic sinus infections
  • Non-burning chest pain
  • Painful swallowing
  • Persistent sore throat
  • Persistent laryngitis/hoarseness
  • Recurrent lung infections
  • Sense of a lump in your throat
  • Stomach (upper abdominal pain)
  • Waking up with a choking sensation
  • Worsening dental disease

acid-reflux-400x400

Do foods cause heartburn or acid reflux? You already know they do! Here’s a quick list of common food that worsen or trigger symptoms:

  • Alcohol (think red wine)
  • Caffeinated drinks, including coffee, soda and tea
  • Chocolate
  • Citrus fruits and products, including oranges and orange juice
  • Peppermint
  • Spicy foods, such as black pepper, garlic, raw onions and tomatoes.

When should I seek help for reflux? Although you should feel free to contact your healthcare provider for any symptoms, you should be aware that the following signs and symptoms may indicate a more serious problem. The presence of any of these should prompt you to visit and emergency room or otherwise contact your physician immediately. Please do not assume because you’ve had these symptoms previously, that the symptoms represent the same thing they always have.

  • Chest pain
  • Choking
  • Difficulty or pain with swallowing, or a sensation that your food gets stuck
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Vomiting blood or have Bleeding (vomiting blood or dark-colored stools)

In the next Straight, No Chaser, we’ll review some complications, how GERD is diagnosed and treatment options.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Comments Off on Straight, No Chaser: Acid Reflux (Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease)

Filed under Gastrointestinal

Straight, No Chaser: Treating Your Gas and Gas Pains

So… you have problems with gas. What are you to do? Well, given that gas production is a natural occurrence, it’s not like you’re going to eliminate having gas (no pun intended). If you read the previous post on what produces belching and flatus, you should have a good idea as to why different things affect you the way they do. Understanding this directly leads into how you can prevent, reduce and treat untoward gas production.

gas-bloating

I’ll make this simple. If you want to reduce the amount of gas you produce, think of these three considerations within your reach. If these efforts prove ineffective, your physician may prescribe medicine, but this should not be the initial consideration.

Adjust your diet

  • If you recall the variety of foods that produce gas or simply remember foods high in carbohydrates produce more gas than foods high in fat or protein, that’s a start. Unfortunately this requires thought and balance. Many healthy foods produce gas (e.g. fruits, vegetables and whole grains). You don’t want to create an unhealthy diet in pursuit of convenience. Be reminded that while fat does not cause gas to the extent that carbohydrates do, limiting high-fat foods can still help reduce bloating and discomfort. Less fat in the diet helps the stomach empty faster. This allows gases to move more quickly through the digestive system.
  • If you believe or know yourself to be lactose intolerant, simple avoidance of dairy products will improve your situation.

chewing gum

Change how you eat

  • Your eating habits play a role in this. For example, if you are a fast eater, you’re likely gulping down air. Slow it down, and chew more thoroughly.
  • Think about how you chew. Do you keep your mouth open? If so, that involves swallowing more air. Now think about those people who habitually chew gum or hard candies with their mouths open. These are habits easily altered.
  • Keep your dentures or dental plates adjusted so they fit. The constant production of air pockets in those loose spaces can get transmitted down your digestive track as you chew. A little attention in this direction can lead to a lot less gas. Check with your dentist.

gas-x

Over-the-counter (OTC) treatments

You know certain OTC medicines well. It’s reasonable for you to know what they’re doing.

  • Beano (alpha-galactosidase) is a digestive aid. It helps the body digest the sugar contained within beans and many vegetables. It doesn’t affect gas production from lactose or fiber.
  • Mylanta, Maalox or Gas-X (simethicone) also can relieve bloating and abdominal pain or discomfort caused by gas. These products don’t affect gas production but do increase the rate of gas elimination. Thus, even when it seems as if one of these is not producing immediate relief, it’s likely helping.
  • Lactase tablets or drops can help people with lactose intolerance digest milk and milk products to reduce gas production. Lactose intolerance is discussed in detail in another Straight, No Chaser post.

Here’s a final word of caution. Gas pain may not be due to simple considerations. Those who burp frequently can have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Cardiac disease can present with gas pain. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be a reason why you’re more sensitive to gas pain. There are many other examples.

Remember: if these tips aren’t effective in improving your gas discomfort, please consider getting evaluated.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Diet and Nutrition, Gastrointestinal

Straight, No Chaser: Eructation (Belching) and Flatus (The Other One)

Belching

It seems like Straight, No Chaser is unafraid to address any topic! This, here’s one of those conversations that everyone wants to have but rarely does. Gas is a natural phenomenon. That’s a given. However, all of us probably want to and would benefit from knowing why it’s happening and what can be done to minimize those odoriferous emanations from above and below. Here are some frequently asked questions on the gas you pass.

flatus 

What is gas?

Gas is a byproduct of the digestive process or of your swallowing air. It’s some combination of oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, nitrogen and methane gases. Remember the digestive tract extends from your mouth to your anus, so depending on where the gas is produced, the gas may be expressed from either end of you through burps or flatus.

Why would I swallow air?

Everyone swallows a small amount of air when eating and drinking. The amount of air swallowed increases when people eat or drink too fast, chew gum or suck or hard candy, drink carbonated beverages, smoke or wear loose-fitting dentures.

 belching cows

Why does gas have that smell?

Flatus (gas passed through the anus) may contain small amounts of sulfur. Flatus that contains more sulfur gasses has more odor.

Why do I produce so much gas? 

  • Passing gas is normal. In fact, the average person does so about 15-20 times a day. Many things can cause you to produce more, including eating a lot of carbohydrates (e.g. sugars, starches, fibers). The upper parts of the digestive system (stomach and small intestines) are as effective as the lower intestines as breaking down carbohydrates. When the lower intestines do so, gases including hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane gas or hydrogen sulfide (a sulfur gas – as mentioned, methane and sulfur as more noticeably smelly gases). This isn’t as much of an issue with fat and protein based diets.
  • Constipation also results in increased amounts of methane production.
  • Conditions that disrupt the digestive system can have the same effect. Examples include diabetes and Crohn’s disease.

 flatulence foodsflatusbeans

Can you give examples of foods that are carbohydrates and cause gas?

There’s wide variation between individuals in how foods are digested. As an example, consider the effect of being lactose intolerant. Some foods that may cause gas include

  • fruits such as pears, apples, and peaches
  • vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, onions, mushrooms, artichokes, and asparagus
  • whole grains such as whole wheat and bran
  • sodas; fruit drinks, especially apple juice and pear juice; and other drinks that contain high-fructose corn syrup, a sweetener made from corn
  • beans
  • milk and milk products such as cheese, ice cream, and yogurt
  • packaged foods—such as bread, cereal, and salad dressing—that contain small amounts of lactose, a sugar found in milk and foods made with milk
  • sugar-free candies and gums that contain sugar alcohols such as sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol

 belching1

What are the symptoms of gas?

In addition to burping and passing gas, bloating and abdominal discomfort are common.

When should I be seen for gas?

It’s easy to be distracted by what you believe to be simple gas pains. If your symptoms are new or different (especially if you’re above age 40), or if your gas symptoms are accompanied by diarrhea, constipation or weight loss, you should get evaluated. Of course, severe pain seems to be the most common prompt for an evaluation.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

 

Comments Off on Straight, No Chaser: Eructation (Belching) and Flatus (The Other One)

Filed under Gastrointestinal