Author Archives: Jeffrey Sterling, MD

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Straight, No Chaser: STDs – Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea_enHD_1

Some of you are old enough to remember when Gonorrhea was called ‘The Clap’, but do any of you know why it was called that? Read on for the answer. In the meantime, realize how disgusting a disease this is. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that well over 800,000 cases of gonorrhea occur yearly. To make matters worse, have you heard about the new ‘Super Gonorrhea’? Don’t let this happen to you.

Here’s what I want you to know about Gonorrhea:

Gonorrhea

1. It’s a real good reason to wear condoms and a just as good of a reason to wash your hands. Gonorrhea most commonly presents with no symptoms (more often the case in women), but it has two symptoms that won’t let you forget it. It’s the STD that may present with burning upon urination so severe that you feel like you are peeing razor blades. It’s also defined by copious discharge. If you’re exuding white, yellow or green pus, think gonorrhea. As was the case with Chlamydia, it can affect the rectum (proctitis) or a portion of the testicles (epidydimitis), as well as the throat or eyes. Wash your hands after using the bathroom, gents.

PHIL_3766

2. It’s contagious. If you’re sexually active with someone infected, odds are you’ll get it. It can be acquired via oral, vaginal or anal sex, and ejaculation isn’t required for transmission. Even worse, that means you can pass it to your newborn child (There’s even a name for the condition: ophthalmia neonatorum, as seen in the above picture.).

2. Treatment doesn’t prevent you from reacquiring it. If you don’t change the behavior, you won’t change the future risk.

gonorrhea dc

3. If both partners aren’t treated, then neither is treated. This can just get passed back and forth like a ping-pong ball. If you have several sexual partners, you’ll manage to introduce a lot of drama into a lot of lives. If you are treated, you should not engage in sexual activity until one week after your partner has completed treatment.

4. It causes serious complications. PID (pelvic inflammatory disease – a complication of untreated Gonorrhea and Chlamydia) is a serious enough topic to warrant its own post, but untreated infections lead to infertility and an increased rate of tubal (ectopic) pregnancies. Gonorrhea also spreads through the blood and joints. Many of these complications are life-threatening.

gonorrhea stat

5. STDs hang out together. Gonorrhea that goes untreated increases the chances of acquiring or transmitting HIV/AIDS. An infection with Gonorrhea should prompt treatment for other STDs and testing for HIV. It is generally assumed that if you have gonorrhea, you’ve likely been infected with Chlamydia.

6. It is easily prevented and treated. Wear condoms each time, every time. Get evaluated early with the development of signs or symptoms. Discuss the discovery of Gonorrhea with all sexual contacts from the last several months. This is an infection you don’t have to catch.

7. It is now super, but not in a good way. Due to antibiotic resistance, treatment of gonorrhea is becoming more complicated. We are seeing more patients who don’t respond to the first course of treatment. Consider antibiotic resistance if symptoms persists more than three days after completion of treatment.

Now, about The Clap.

gonorrhea1

Traditionally, there have been three theories about why gonorrhea used to be commonly called the clap, only one of which sound legitimate to me.

1. Treatment (allegedly) used to involved ‘clapping’ a book together around the penis to expel the discharge. Not only does that not make sense, I can’t imagine men letting someone smash their penis in that manner, when you could just ‘milk’ the discharge out (no pun intended). This is a very common explanation, though…

2. The clap may be a mispronunciation of the phrase ‘the collapse’, which is what gonorrhea was called by medics when GIs were being infected with gonorrhea in WWII.

3. Finally, perhaps, clap is derived from the French word for brothel, “clapper.” Makes sense if you’re in Paris, but in NY, why wouldn’t it have been called ‘the broth’, because that’s kind of how it looks… Sorry if you’re reading this during breakfast. Then again, I did spare you a picture of genital gonorrhea.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under Genital/Urinary, Infectious Disease, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Straight, No Chaser: STDs – Chlamydia Infections

Chlamydia_image

For most people, NGU isn’t a college in South Carolina. In fact, non-gonococcal urethritis isn’t really even that anymore, meaning it doesn’t need to be defined by the fact that it’s not gonorrhea. Chlamydia (the most common cause of NGU) by itself causes an estimated 3 million sexually transmitted infections a year. It is the most likely reason you’re coming into the emergency department when someone’s been behaving badly, and it was the most common sexually transmitted infection for a long time (prior to the advent of human papillomavirus – HPV). This Straight, No Chaser gives you some essential information about sexually transmitted infections featuring Chlamydia.
chlamydia

1. It’s a real good reason to wear condoms. Chlamydia most commonly presents with no symptoms but may present with burning with urination, having to go more often (that’s the urethritis; the urethra is the tube through which urine flows) and a cloudy discharge. Less commonly, it can affect the rectum (proctitis) or a portion of the testicles (epidydimitis).

chlaymdia neonatal

2. It’s contagious. If you’re sexually active with someone infected, odds are you’ll get it. It can be acquired via oral, vaginal or anal sex, and ejaculation isn’t required for transmission. Even worse, that means you can pass it to your newborn child (to disastrous effects to the baby, as noted in the lead picture of the newborn; Chlamydia has long been a significant cause of blindness worldwide, though thankfully the rate is decreasing).

Chlamydia-rate

2. Treatment doesn’t prevent you from reacquiring it. If you don’t change the behavior, you won’t change the future risk.

3. If both partners aren’t treated, then neither is treated. This can just get passed back and forth like a ping-pong ball. If you have several sexual partners, you’ll manage to introduce a lot of drama into a lot of lives. If you are treated, you should not engage in sexual activity until one week after your partner(s) have completed treatment.

Chlamydia stats

4. It causes serious damage to females. PID (pelvic inflammatory disease – a complication of untreated Chlamydia) is a serious enough topic to warrant its own post, but untreated infections lead to infertility, an increased rate of tubal (ectopic) pregnancies and other complications. This needs to be identified and treated.

5. STDs hang out together. Chlamydia that goes untreated increases the chances of acquiring or transmitting HIV/AIDS. An infection with Chlamydia should prompt treatment for other STDs and testing for HIV.

chlamydia infection condom

6. It is easily prevented and treated. Wear condoms each time, every time. Get evaluated early with development of signs or symptoms. Discuss the discovery of Chlamydia with all sexual contacts from the last several months. This is an infection you don’t have to catch.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

 

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Filed under Genital/Urinary, Infectious Disease, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Straight, No Chaser: The Doctor/Patient Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Talk

stdstudSTD1in25

As an emergency physician, my first consideration is to eliminate life threats.  Along the way, I cure disease and provide a ton of information.  With all of these efforts, I provide a heavy dose of tough love and straight talk meant to empower (and hopefully never belittle).  This is heavy on my mind because this week we’ll be discussing sex – not the pleasant aspects, but those instances when something has gone wrong as a result of sex.

std-statistics-worldwide-infographic

I’ve been on the receiving end of hundreds (more likely thousands) of couples coming in, usually one dragging the other by the ear, attempting to determine if “something’s going on”, and yes, more than a few relationships have left the emergency room dissolved after such conversations.  I would like to have the beginning of such a conversation with you much in the way that I might have with one of these couples.  This is a very appropriate prelude to a conversation about sexuality transmitted infections (aka STIs aka STDs).

Patient: I have a foul smell coming from my vagina.  I know he’s doing something!

Doctor: Can you tell me what it smells like?  Is there any vaginal discharge, rash or other lesions that you’re seeing?

Male partner (who would have been better off saying nothing): It smells like fish!

Patient (after shooting eye lasers at her partner): I am not having sex with anyone but him, so I know he did something!

Male partner: Doc, I’m not doing anything.  She’s the only one I’m with, and I don’t have any symptoms.

Doctor: So each of you only has each other as a partner?

Couple: <nods yes>

Doctor: Would you bet your lives on it?

Couple: <Stunned silence>

Doctor: Well that’s exactly what you’re doing every time you’re having unprotected sex.  Now about that discharge…

This upcoming week we are going to address several of most common and/or most important STIs out there for you to know about.

std red-carpet-celebrities-with-stds

Chlamydia

Gonorrhea

Syphilis

Herpes

Not talking about them, not protecting yourself from them, and not testing yourself for them is truly believing that ignorance is bliss.  In this case, what you don’t know can kill you.  No matter what you think about how ‘good’ it is, it’s not worth risking your life over.  Also, as an additional conversation, I’ll discuss Bacterial Vaginosis.

If you’re sexually active, you really should follow this series. There’s going to be a lot covered. Might I suggest you cover it as well?

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

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Filed under General Health and Wellness

Straight, No Chaser: Male Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

saddle

Yes, you read that correctly. We’re discussing men’s reproductive health. Of course there is a preoccupation with women’s reproductive health (and we addressed that in another Straight, No Chaser, but men also need to be aware of conditions in their work environment that can have adverse effects on their ability to have healthy children. Knowledge of these conditions is a necessary first step toward implementing workplace changes that can keep you safe and healthy.

Let’s share a brief list of common reproductive hazards up front for you to see.

  • Chemicals and solvents
  • Cigarettes
  • Drugs (legal and illegal)
  • Heat
  • Pesticides
  • Radiation
  • Traumatic risks

An unfortunate consideration in discussing this topic is most potential hazards have not and will not ever be studied to fully understand their effects on humans; it would simply be unethical to conduct such studies. That said, over 1000 chemicals used in the workplace have been shown to have adverse effects on the reproductive health of animals.

workforce

Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, I’m listing known reproductive problems and workplace hazards demonstrated to cause those problems. Most of you who work in environments featuring any of the aforementioned reproductive hazards are aware of the presence of certain chemicals, pesticides, solvents and others substances being used. Review the hazards. If these are common in your workplace, engage your employee health representative to discuss precautions that are and/or should be in place to minimize your exposure and risk. Make sure you’re fully protected. It is important to note that I’m describing risk here. These effects do not routinely occur in every worker at just any level of exposure. Whether or not an exposure will cause a reproductive problem depends on the amount of time you’re exposed, the amount of the hazard you’re exposed to, how you were exposed and how your body reacts to the hazard. Because every hazard has not been studied for its effects in humans, this list cannot possibly be complete. Always fully engage in workplace safety.

Here are examples of male reproductive hazards and workplace exposures associated with them:

male repro health risks

  • Low hormone levels: insecticides, lead, organophosphate, DDE, manganese, phthalates
  • Low number of sperm: lead, diesel exhaust, pesticide, bisphenol A, organophosphate, chromium, paraquat/malathion
  • Irregular sperm shape: insecticides, lead, carbon disulfide, pesticides, bisphenol A, petrochemical, carbofuran, nickel
  • Irregular sperm genetics: phthalates, styrene, organophosphate, carbaryl, fenvalerate, lead, benzene
  • Chemicals in semen: lead, trichloroethylene, boron, cadmium
  • Low amount of semen: lead, organophosphate, paraquat/malathion
  • Low number of swimming sperm: insecticides, diesel exhaust, lead, carbon disulfide, phthalates, pesticides, bisphenol A, fenvalerate, petrochemical, welding, N, N-dimethylformamide, abamectin, paraquat/malathion
  • Lower sex drive: carbon disulfide, bisphenol A
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED): bisphenol A, bicycle saddles
  • Lower penis sensitivity: bicycle saddles
  • Lower ejaculation quality: bisphenol A

workplace risk assessment

If you are not familiar with the substances just listed but know that you work in an environment with hazardous materials, consider printing out the page and taking it to your job. Ask your safety officer if your workplace exposes you to any of these substances and if so, what protections are in place for workers.

As a final consideration, be aware that many of these substances can be transported out of the work environment back to your home or other locations, exposing others. Be mindful to take the extra step to protect yourself and others by avoiding prolonged and unnecessary exposures to workplace hazards.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Genital/Urinary, Occupational Health

Straight, No Chaser: Advanced Maternal Age

advanced-maternal-age-tt

Times have changed. Marriages are increasingly career-focused, and couples more and more choose to have babies later in life. It is helpful that these decisions can now be aided by recent innovations in medicine regarding fertility. Unfortunately, changes in societal norms don’t remove risks inherent in the human condition. Advanced Maternal Age is a medical consideration for any woman considering childbirth after age 35. The bottom line is advanced maternal age comes with risks. If you or a loved one is considering childbirth after age 35, you need to be aware of these risks and how to minimize them. These include the following.

It likely will take longer to get pregnant.

If pregnant, you will have an increased risk of miscarriage.

If successfully pregnant, you’re more likely to have any of several medical conditions, including the following:

  • Gestational diabetes
  • Pregnancy-induced hypertension
  • Placental previa (in which the “afterbirth” material can inadvertently cover all or part of the uterine opening, causing bleeding and a need for C-section)

Halle Berry takes daughter Nahla for her passport photo in Beverly Hills, California. Pictured: Halle Berry Ref: SPL549901 240513 Picture by: Headlinephoto / Splash News Splash News and Pictures Los Angeles:310-821-2666 New York: 212-619-2666 London: 870-934-2666 photodesk@splashnews.com

If you successfully deliver, your child is more likely to be at risk for any of several medical conditions, including the following:

  • Down Syndrome and other chromosomal birth defects, causing abnormalities in the transmission of heredity information via the genes)
  • Low birth weight and prematurity

janetama

Even though you can never eliminate the above risks, you can reduce them. Consider the following among the list of healthy choices you should make to give yourself the best change to have a healthy baby at an advanced maternal age. All of these recommendations should be adapted in conjunction with your obstetrician.

Get prenatal care before you actually get pregnant and keep it during your pregnancy. You will need to discuss your personalized risks, your health profile, the correct strategy for weight gain, and any prenatal testing that may be necessary.

Eat a nutritious diet, including recommended amounts of calcium, folic acid, iron, Vitamin D, and a daily prenatal vitamin. These dietary habits should begin well before you become pregnant.

Stay physically active. Health basics are even more important during this time.

Getting pregnant at an advanced maternal age is a serious decision. Approach it with the consideration and caution it deserves.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

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Filed under Health Prevention, Obstetrics and Gynecology

Straight, No Chaser: Female Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

femrep1

Considerations of female reproductive health are important in the work environment. Many different work settings pose risks to women’s reproductive systems. Generally effects can be divided into those impacting a women’s reproductive system itself and those impacting the well-being of a pregnancy or baby. An additionally important point is these risks to the female reproductive system often bring consequences to one’s overall health.

simpons-toxic-labels

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s reproductive health?

  • Chemicals such as pesticides, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), carbon disulfide or organic solvents can disrupt the menstrual cycle and female hormone production. If you suffer from irregular periods, consider whether any work-related exposure could be a contributor.
  • Approximately 10-15% of couples are infertile. Workplace chemical exposures can produce damage to a woman’s eggs (or a man’s sperm), and they can cause changes to female hormones with subsequent drop-offs in the ability to produce a normal menstrual cycle and have normal uterine growth.

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s general health as a result of impacting reproductive health?

  • Remember that hormones affect other parts of your body and health other than your reproductive system. Therefore even if you aren’t concerned with becoming pregnant, cause for concern still exists. Imbalances of estrogen and progesterone caused by some workplace exposures can also increase your risk to:
    • Cancers such as endometrial or breast
    • Heart disease
    • Osteoporosis
    • Symptoms of menopause
    • Tissue loss or weakening

femrep5

How do workplace hazards pose risks during pregnancy?

  • It should come as no surprise that certain exposures can cause birth defects or miscarriages. You should be aware of the timing of exposures and subsequent potential effects. Exposure during the first 3 months of pregnancy might cause a birth defect or a miscarriage. Exposure during the last 6 months of pregnancy could slow the baby’s growth, affect its brain development, or cause premature labor.

Breastfeeding-600x330

How do workplace hazards pose risks to babies?

Some chemicals can get into breast milk and others can be transmitted to infants through contact occurring on a parents clothes, skin or hair. Of course, not all chemicals get into breast milk, and not all chemicals that do will harm your baby. Here are a few chemicals that can get into breast milk:

  • Chemicals from smoke, fires, or tobacco
  • Heavy metals (e.g. lead, mercury)
  • Organic solvents and volatile organic chemicals (e.g. bromochloroethane, dioxane, formaldehyde and perchloroethylene)
  • Radioactive chemicals used in hospitals for radiation therapy (e.g as Iodine-131)

Some harmful chemicals have been measured in breast milk at levels that could harm the baby. Lead is one example. Lead in breast milk can harm a baby’s brain. If you work with lead, ask your doctor to measure your blood lead level to see if there is too much lead in your body to safely breastfeed your baby.

For all of these considerations, talk to your employer or your workplace safety officer about ways you can reduce or eliminate your exposure. This might include using personal protective equipment (PPE) or changing your work duties. If you use gloves, protective clothing, a respirator, or other PPE, be sure they are right for you and the chemical to which you are exposed.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

 

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Filed under Genital/Urinary, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Toxicology/Drugs

Straight, No Chaser: Healthcare Disparities

Disparities

In large part, this blog exists to inform individuals of all backgrounds about the risks that lead to abnormal health outcomes. Our hope is that once you discover the risks, you’ll be sufficiently equipped and incentivized to take the simple steps provided to improve your health.

Disparities are abnormal outcomes of a different variety. Disparities in healthcare lead to premature development of disease and death. The culprits are often insufficient access to care, culture barriers, habits and even discriminatory practices. It is critical for all involved, i.e., individuals, healthcare planners and practitioners, to understand these causes so that everyone can adjust habits and apply resources to combat this health hazard affecting both individuals and communities.

For the last 25 years of my career, I’ve had the unfortunate privilege of addressing this topic in national forums, including before the National Urban League, before the National Medical Association, recently, in the NAACP’s The Crisis magazine and in Straight, No Chaser to extent that our service provides you with the information that can make a difference in your lives. Unfortunately for some, it’s almost never that easy.

 disparities_infant-mortality

As a statement of fact, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health Disparities & Inequalities Report 
of 2013, African-Americans suffer global health disparities that result in the following outcomes.

  • Life expectancy: In 2011, the average American could expect to live 78.7 years. The average African-American could only expect to live 75.3 years, compared with 78.8 years for the average White American.
  • Death rates: In 2009, African-Americans had the highest death rates from homicide among all racial and ethnic populations. Rates among African-American males were the highest for males across all age groups.
  • Infant mortality rates: In 2008, infants of African-American women had the highest death rate among American infants with a rate more than twice as high as infants of white women.

 disparitydm

The following disparities were also reported:

  • Heart disease and stroke: In 2009, African-Americans had the largest death rates from heart disease and stroke compared with other racial and ethnic populations, with disparities across all age groups younger than 85 years of age.
  • High blood pressure: From 2007-2010, the prevalence of hypertension was among adults aged 65 years and older, African-American adults, US-born adults, adults with less than a college education, adults who received public health insurance (18-64 years old) and those with diabetes, obesity or a disability compared with their counterparts. The percentages of African-Americans and Hispanics who had control of high blood pressure were lower compared to white adults.
  • Obesity: From 2007-2010, the prevalence of obesity among adults was highest among African-American women compared with white and Mexican American women and men. Obesity prevalence among African-American adults was the largest compared to other race ethnicity groups.
  • Diabetes: In 2010, the prevalence of diabetes among African-American adults was nearly twice as large as that for white adults.
  • Activity limitations caused by chronic conditions: From 1999-2008, the number of years of expected life free of activity limitations caused by chronic conditions is disproportionately higher for African-American adults than whites.
  • Periodontitis: In 2009-2010, the prevalence of periodontitis (a form of dental disease) was greatest among African-American and Mexican American adults compared with white adults.
  • HIV: In 2010, African-American adults had the largest HIV infection rate compared with rates among other racial and ethnic populations. Prescribed HIV treatment among African-American adults living with HIV was less than among white adults.
  • Access to care: In 2010, Hispanic and African-American adults aged 18-64 years had larger percentages without health insurance compared with white and Asian/Pacific Islander counterparts.
  • Colorectal cancer: In 2008, African-Americans had the largest incidence and death rates from colorectal cancer of all racial and ethnic populations despite similar colorectal screening rates compared to white adults.
  • Influenza vaccination: During the 2010-11 influenza season, influenza vaccination coverage was similar for African-American and white children aged six months to 17 years but lower among African-American adults compared with white adults.
  • Socioeconomic factors: In 2011, similar to other minority adults aged 25 years or older, a larger percentage of African-American adults did not complete high school compared with white adults. A larger percentage of African-American adults also lived below the poverty level and were unemployed (adults aged 18-64 years) compared with white adults of the same age.

disparityuninsured

Identifying disparities is a good start. However, to reduce them it is necessary to identify and implement solutions, both individually and institutionally. To this end, we will explore best practices in future Straight, No Chaser posts. Feel free to ask any questions you have on this topic.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.

Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!

Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

 

Leave a comment

Filed under General Health and Wellness, Health Prevention, Public Health